Tristan Harris
Book Recommendations

  • The Attention Merchants

    The Attention Merchants

    The Attention Merchants

    Tim Wu
    Business & Economics
    4.09 (3,784)

    Feeling attention challenged? even assaulted? american business depends on it. in nearly every moment of our waking lives, we face a barrage of messaging, advertising enticements, branding, sponsored social media, and other efforts to harvest our attention. few moments or spaces of our day remain uncultivated by the "attention merchants," contributing to the distracted, unfocused tenor of our times. tim wu argues that this condition is not simply the byproduct of recent technological innovations but the result of more than a century's growth and expansion in the industries that feed

    Tristan Harris

    Absolutely, must read Tim Wu's book "The Attention Merchants.

     — Source

  • Finite and Infinite Games

    Finite and Infinite Games

    Finite and Infinite Games

    James P. Carse
    Philosophy
    3.86 (4,807)

    An extraordinary book that will dramatically change the way you experience life.finite games are the familiar contests of everyday life, the games we play in business and politics, in the bedroom and on the battlefied -- games with winners and losers, a beginning and an end. infinite games are more mysterious -- and ultimately more rewarding. they are unscripted and unpredictable; they are the source of true freedom.in this elegant and compelling work, james carse explores what these games mean, and what they can mean to you. he offers stunning

    Tristan Harris

    highly recommended by Stewart Brand and a lot of other really, really folks I respect a whole lot.

     — Source

  • Technopoly

    Technopoly

    Technopoly

    Neil Postman
    Technology & Engineering
    3.93 (3,775)

    Tristan Harris

    Technopoly, which...is about how when culture surrenders to technology. And especially the quantification of metrics and SAT score

     — Source

  • The 22 Immutable Laws of Marketing

    The 22 Immutable Laws of Marketing

    The 22 Immutable Laws of Marketing

    Al Ries,Jack Trout
    Marketing
    4.04 (19,048)

    There are laws of nature, so why shouldn't there be laws of marketing?as al ries and jack trout—the world-renowned marketing consultants and bestselling authors of positioning—note, you can build an impressive airplane, but it will never leave the ground if you ignore the laws of physics, especially gravity. why then, they ask, shouldn't there also be laws of marketing that must be followed to launch and maintain winning brands? in the 22 immutable laws of marketing, ries and trout offer a compendium of twenty-two innovative rules for understanding and succeeding

    Tristan Harris

    a profound book for me

     — Source

  • Don't Shoot the Dog!

    Don't Shoot the Dog!

    Don't Shoot the Dog!

    Karen Pryor
    Behavior modification
    4.26 (5,322)

    Originally published entitled: don't shoot the dog!: how to improve yourself and others through behavioral training, new york: simon and schuster, 1984.

    Tristan Harris

    Amazing book. It's funny

     — Source

  • Words That Work

    Words That Work

    Words That Work

    Frank Luntz
    3.63 (1,974)

    In words that work, luntz offers a behind-the-scenes look at how the tactical use of words and phrases affects what we buy, who we vote for, and even what we believe in. with chapters like "the ten rules of successful communication" and "the 21 words and phrases for the 21st century," he examines how choosing the right words is essential. nobody is in a better position to explain than frank luntz: he has used his knowledge of words to help more than two dozen fortune 500 companies grow. hell tell

    Tristan Harris

    Recommended on Tim Ferriss' podcast

     — Source

  • Wherever You Go, There You Are

    Wherever You Go, There You Are

    Wherever You Go, There You Are

    Jon Kabat-Zinn
    Self-Help
    4.11 (41,829)

    In this book, the author maps out a simple path for cultivating mindfulness in one's own life. it speaks both to those coming to meditation for the first time and to longtime practitioners, anyone who cares deeply about reclaiming the richness of his or her moments.

    Tristan Harris

    Recommended on Tim Ferriss' podcast

     — Source

  • Brave New World

    Brave New World

    Brave New World

    Aldous Huxley
    Fiction
    3.99 (1,609,283)

    Brave new world is a dystopian novel by english author aldous huxley, written in 1931 and published in 1932. largely set in a futuristic world state, inhabited by genetically modified citizens and an intelligence-based social hierarchy, the novel anticipates huge scientific advancements in reproductive technology, sleep-learning, psychological manipulation and classical conditioning that are combined to make a dystopian society which is challenged by only a single individual: the story's protagonist.

    Tristan Harris

    Recommended on Tim Ferriss' podcast

     — Source

  • Metaphors We Live By

    Metaphors We Live By

    Metaphors We Live By

    George Lakoff,Mark Johnson
    4.09 (5,427)

    The now-classic metaphors we live by changed our understanding of metaphor and its role in language and the mind. metaphor, the authors explain, is a fundamental mechanism of mind, one that allows us to use what we know about our physical and social experience to provide understanding of countless other subjects. because such metaphors structure our most basic understandings of our experience, they are "metaphors we live by", metaphors that can shape our perceptions and actions without our ever noticing them.in this updated edition of lakoff and johnson's influential book,

    Tristan Harris

    Recommended on Tim Ferriss' podcast

     — Source

  • Winners Take All

    Winners Take All

    Winners Take All

    Anand Giridharadas
    Social Science
    4.16 (13,355)

    Former new york times columnist anand giridharadas takes us into the inner sanctums of a new gilded age, where the rich and powerful fight for equality and justice any way they can--except ways that threaten the social order and their position atop it. we see how they rebrand themselves as saviors of the poor; how they lavishly reward "thought leaders" who redefine "change" in winner-friendly ways; and how they constantly seek to do more good, but never less harm. we hear the limousine confessions of a celebrated foundation boss; witness

    Tristan Harris

    Recommended on Tim Ferriss' podcast

     — Source

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