Books written by Stewart Brand

  • Whole Earth Discipline

    Whole Earth Discipline

    Whole Earth Discipline

    Stewart Brand
    Business & Economics

    Discusses the ways in which climate change will affect the next half century and explores such topics as the green potential of cities, the virtues of nuclear engineering, and the sustainability of genetically modified crops.

  • How Buildings Learn

    How Buildings Learn

    How Buildings Learn

    Stewart Brand
    Architecture

    Buildings have often been studies whole in space, but never before have they been studied whole in time. How Buildings Learn is a masterful new synthesis that proposes that buildings adapt best when constantly refined and reshaped by their occupants, and that architects can mature from being artists of space to becoming artists of time. From the connected farmhouses of New England to I.M. Pei's Media Lab, from "satisficing" to "form follows funding," from the evolution of bungalows to the invention of Santa Fe Style, from Low Road military surplus buildings to a High Road English classic like Chatsworth—this is a far-ranging survey of unexplored essential territory. More than any other human artifacts, buildings improve with time—if they're allowed to. How Buildings Learn shows how to work with time rather than against it.

  • The Clock Of The Long Now

    The Clock Of The Long Now

    The Clock Of The Long Now

    Stewart Brand
    Philosophy

    Using the designing and building of the Clock of the Long Now as a framework, this is a book about the practical use of long time perspective: how to get it, how to use it, how to keep it in and out of sight. Here are the central questions it inspires: How do we make long-term thinking automatic and common instead of difficult and rare? Discipline in thought allows freedom. One needs the space and reliability to predict continuity to have the confidence not to be afraid of revolutions Taking the time to think of the future is more essential now than ever, as culture accelerates beyond its ability to be measured Probable things are vastly outnumbered by countless near-impossible eventualities. Reality is statistically forced to be extraordinary; fiction is not allowed this freedom This is a potent book that combines the chronicling of fantastic technology with equally visionary philosophical inquiry.

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