Noam Chomsky's favorite books

  • Selling Free Enterprise

    Selling Free Enterprise

    Selling Free Enterprise

    Elizabeth A. Fones-Wolf
    Business & Economics
    4.27 (44)

    The post-World War II years in the United States were marked by the business community's efforts to discredit New Deal liberalism and undermine the power and legitimacy of organized labor. In Selling Free Enterprise, Elizabeth Fones-Wolf describes how conservative business leaders strove to reorient workers away from their loyalties to organized labor and government, teaching that prosperity could be achieved through reliance on individual initiative, increased productivity, and the protection of personal liberty. Based on research in a wide variety of business and labor sources, this detailed account shows how business permeated every aspect of American life, including factories, schools, churches, and community institutions.

    Noam Chomsky

    One of the books he used as reference.

     — Source

  • The New Intifada
    Noam Chomsky

    One of the books he used as reference.

     — Source

  • Just the Facts
    Noam Chomsky

    One of the books he used as reference.

     — Source

  • Reflections on the Cuban Missile Crisis

    Reflections on the Cuban Missile Crisis

    Reflections on the Cuban Missile Crisis

    Raymond Garthoff
    Political Science

    The Soviet response to the first edition of Reflections has been a prime example of the new openness under glasnost in discussing previously taboo subjects. Using new revelations—such as the fact that Moscow had twice as many troops in Cuba as the Kennedy administration believed—from key Soviet and Cuban Sources, Garthoff has revised his earlier analysis to produce the most accurate, eye-opening story yet of the 1963 crisis. In this book Raymond L. Garthoff, a participant in the crisis deliberations of the U.S. government, reflects on the nature of the crisis, it's consequences, and it's lessons for the future. He provides a unique combination of memoir, historical analysis, and political interpretations. He gives particular attention to the aftermath and "afterlife" of the crisis and to its bearing on current and future policy. In the first edition of the book in 1987 the Garthoff presented a number of facts for the first time. Since then, more information has become available, particularly form Soviet sources, in part from conferences in which Garthoff participated but even more from individual interviews and research. This new information, much of it presented here in this volume for the first time, helps to fill in gaps in our knowledge about events and motivations on the Soviet side. More importantly, it enlarges our understanding of the crisis interaction.

    Noam Chomsky

    One of the books he used as reference.

     — Source

  • Image and Reality of the Israel-Palestine Conflict

    Image and Reality of the Israel-Palestine Conflict

    Image and Reality of the Israel-Palestine Conflict

    Norman G. Finkelstein
    History
    4.28 (469)

    This acclaimed study surveys the dominant popular and scholarly images of the Israel–Palestine conflict. Finkelstein opens with a theoretical discussion of Zionism, locating it as a romantic form of nationalism that assumed the bankruptcy of liberal democracy. He goes on to look at the demographic origins of the Palestinians, with particular reference to the work of Joan Peters, and develops critiques of the influential studies of both Benny Morris and Anita Shapira. Reviewing the diplomatic history with Aban Eban‘s oeuvre as his foil, Finkelstein closes by demonstrating that the casting of Israel as the innocent victim of Arab aggression in the June 1967 and October 1973 wars is not supported by the documentary record. This new edition critically reexamines dominant popular and scholarly images in the light of the current failures of the peace process.

    Noam Chomsky

    One of the books he used as reference.

     — Source

  • Supremacy and Oil
    Noam Chomsky

    One of the books he used as reference.

     — Source

  • East Timor
    Noam Chomsky

    One of the books he used as reference.

     — Source

  • Arguing About War

    Arguing About War

    Arguing About War

    Michael Walzer
    Political Science
    3.41 (144)

    Michael Walzer is one of the world’s most eminent philosophers on the subject of war and ethics. Now, for the first time since his classic Just and Unjust Wars was published almost three decades ago, this volume brings together his most provocative arguments about contemporary military conflicts and the ethical issues they raise.The essays in the book are divided into three sections. The first deals with issues such as humanitarian intervention, emergency ethics, and terrorism. The second consists of Walzer’s responses to particular wars, including the first Gulf War, Kosovo, Afghanistan, and Iraq. And the third presents an essay in which Walzer imagines a future in which war might play a less significant part in our lives. In his introduction, Walzer reveals how his thinking has changed over time.Written during a period of intense debate over the proper use of armed force, this book gets to the heart of difficult problems and argues persuasively for a moral perspective on war.

    Noam Chomsky

    One of the books he used as reference.

     — Source

  • The Anatomy of the Nuremberg Trials

    The Anatomy of the Nuremberg Trials

    The Anatomy of the Nuremberg Trials

    Telford Taylor
    History
    4.10 (169)

    In 1945, the Allied nations agreed on a judicial process, rather than summary execution, to determine the fate of the Nazis following the end of World War II. Held in Nuremberg, the ceremonial birthplace of the Nazi Party, the British, American, French, and Soviet leaders contributed both judges and prosecutors to the series of trials that would prosecute some of the most prominent politicians, military leaders and businessmen in Nazi Germany. This is the definitive history of the Nuremberg crimes trials by one of the key participants, Telford Taylor, the distinguished lawyer who was a member of the American prosecution staff and eventually became chief counsel. In vivid detail, Taylor portrays the unfolding events as he “saw, heard, and otherwise sensed them at the time, and not as a detached historian working from the documents might picture them.” Taylor describes personal vendettas among the Allied representatives and the negotiations that preceded the handing down of sentences. The revelations have not lost their power over the decades: The chamber is reduced to silence when an SS officer recounts impassively that his troops rounded up and killed 90,000 Jews, and panic overcomes the head of the German State Bank as it becomes clear that he knew his institution was receiving jewels and other valuables taken from the bodies of concentration camp inmates. The Anatomy of the Nuremberg Trials has proven to be a defining piece of World War II literature, an engrossing and reflective eyewitness account of one of the most significant events of our century.

    Noam Chomsky

    One of the books he used as reference.

     — Source

  • The Marshall Plan

    The Marshall Plan

    The Marshall Plan

    Michael J. Hogan
    History
    3.81 (27)

    Analyzes the political and economic goals of the Marshall Plan discusses Britain's role in the plan, and assesses the outcome of U.S. aid and advice

    Noam Chomsky

    One of the books he used as reference.

     — Source

  • The Transformation of American Law, 1870-1960

    The Transformation of American Law, 1870-1960

    The Transformation of American Law, 1870-1960

    Morton J. Horwitz
    Law

    When the first volume of Morton Horwitz's monumental history of American law appeared in 1977, it was universally acclaimed as one of the most significant works ever published in American legal history. The New Republic called it an "extremely valuable book." Library Journal praised it as "brilliant" and "convincing." And Eric Foner, in The New York Review of Books, wrote that "the issues it raises are indispensable for understanding nineteenth-century America." It won the coveted Bancroft Prize in American History and has since become the standard source on American law for the period between 1780 and 1860. Now, Horwitz presents The Transformation of American Law, 1870 to 1960, the long-awaited sequel that brings his sweeping history to completion. In his pathbreaking first volume, Horwitz showed how economic conflicts helped transform law in antebellum America. Here, Horwitz picks up where he left off, tracing the struggle in American law between the entrenched legal orthodoxy and the Progressive movement, which arose in response to ever-increasing social and economic inequality. Horwitz introduces us to the people and events that fueled this contest between the Old Order and the New. We sit in on Lochner v. New York in 1905--where the new thinkers sought to undermine orthodox claims for the autonomy of law--and watch as Progressive thought first crystallized. We meet Oliver Wendell Holmes, Jr. and recognize the influence of his incisive ideas on the transformation of law in America. We witness the culmination of the Progressive challenge to orthodoxy with the emergence of Legal Realism in the 1920s and '30s, a movement closely allied with other intellectual trends of the day. And as postwar events unfold--the rise of totalitarianism abroad, the McCarthyism rampant in our own country, the astonishingly hostile academic reaction to Brown v. Board of Education--we come to understand that, rather than self-destructing as some historians have asserted, the Progressive movement was alive and well and forming the roots of the legal debates that still confront us today. The Progressive legacy that this volume brings to life is an enduring one, one which continues to speak to us eloquently across nearly a century of American life. In telling its story, Horwitz strikes a balance between a traditional interpretation of history on the one hand, and an approach informed by the latest historical theory on the other. Indeed, Horwitz's rich view of American history--as seen from a variety of perspectives--is undertaken in the same spirit as the Progressive attacks on an orthodoxy that believed law an objective, neutral entity. The Transformation of American Law is a book certain to revise past thinking on the origins and evolution of law in our country. For anyone hoping to understand the structure of American law--or of America itself--this volume is indispensable.

    Noam Chomsky

    One of the books he used as reference.

     — Source

  • In the Name of Democracy
    Noam Chomsky

    One of the books he used as reference.

     — Source

  • War with Iraq
    Noam Chomsky

    One of the books he used as reference.

     — Source

  • Danger and Survival

    Danger and Survival

    Danger and Survival

    McGeorge Bundy
    Business & Economics
    Political Science

    A key player in nuclear confrontations traces the influence of nuclear weapons on politics

    Noam Chomsky

    One of the books he used as reference.

     — Source

  • Instruments of Statecraft

    Instruments of Statecraft

    Instruments of Statecraft

    Michael McClintock
    Political Science

    Uses recently declassified documents to survey the American use of covert warfare against terrorists and adversarial states

    Noam Chomsky

    One of the books he used as reference.

     — Source

  • Requiem for Revolution

    Requiem for Revolution

    Requiem for Revolution

    Ruth Leacock
    Political Science

    An examination of the Brazilian revolution of 1964 which was not the revolutionary effort that Kennedy had sought. Yet it bore an American, anti-communist imprint. When the president was overthrown, Washington embraced the new regime and gave generous support throughout the 1960s.

    Noam Chomsky

    One of the books he used as reference.

     — Source

  • John Quincy Adams and American Global Empire

    John Quincy Adams and American Global Empire

    John Quincy Adams and American Global Empire

    William Earl Weeks
    History

    This is the story of a man, a treaty, and a nation. The man was John Quincy Adams, regarded by most historians as America's greatest secretary of state. The treaty was the Transcontinental Treaty of 1819, of which Adams was the architect. It acquired Florida for the young United States, secured a western boundary extending to the Pacific, and bolstered the nation's position internationally. As William Weeks persuasively argues, the document also represented the first determined step in the creation of an American global empire. Weeks follows the course of the often labyrinthine negotiations by which Adams wrested the treaty from a recalcitrant Spain. The task required all of Adams's skill in diplomacy, for he faced a tangled skein of domestic and international controversies when he became secretary of state in 1817. The final document provided the United States commercial access to the Orient--a major objective of the Monroe administration that paved the way for the Monroe Doctrine of 1823. Adams, the son of a president and later himself president, saw himself as destined to play a crucial role in the growth and development of the United States. In this he succeeded. Yet his legendary statecraft proved bittersweet. Adams came to repudiate the slave society whose interests he had served by acquiring Florida, he was disgusted by the rapacity of the Jacksonians, and he experienced profound guilt over his own moral transgressions while secretary of state. In the end, Adams understood that great virtue cannot coexist with great power. Weeks's book, drawn in part from articles that won the Stuart Bernath Prize, makes a lasting contribution to our understanding of American foreign policy and adds significantly to our picture of one of the nation's most important statesmen.

    Noam Chomsky

    One of the books he used as reference.

     — Source

  • A Thousand Days
    Noam Chomsky

    One of the books he used as reference.

     — Source

  • The Road to OPEC

    The Road to OPEC

    The Road to OPEC

    Stephen G. Rabe
    Political Science

    On September 10, 1960, Venezuela spearheaded the formation of the Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries (other original members included Saudi Arabia, Iran, Iraq, and Kuwait). However, in a world abundantly supplied with oil, the United States could and did ignore Venezuelan suggestions that OPEC and the consuming nations work together to control production and to increase prices. Then, in late 1973, OPEC sent shudders throughout the world economy, and an energy crisis struck with full force. Emboldened by the power of their oil cartel, Venezuelan leaders denounced the old economic relationship with the United States, nationalized U.S. oil and steel holdings, and fashioned a foreign economic policy that differed sharply from Washington's. The Road to OPEC is the story of the fiery debates among U.S. oil companies, the Department of State, and the Venezuelan government over oil policies—clashes that led Venezuela to establish OPEC and to nationalize U.S.-owned properties. In addition, this is the first study of twentieth-century Venezuelan-U.S. relations. Its focus on oil diplomacy is placed within the context of key U.S. policies toward Latin America and such programs as the Open Door, the Good Neighbor, and the Alliance for Progress. The author also provides insight into both the politics of the contemporary energy crisis and the growing split between raw-material producers and their industrial customers. The Road to OPEC is based on extensive archival research, as well as the author's successful use of the Freedom of Information Act to declassify files of such agencies as the National Security Council and the CIA.

    Noam Chomsky

    One of the books he used as reference.

     — Source

  • Humanitarian Intervention

    Humanitarian Intervention

    Humanitarian Intervention

    Sean D. Murphy
    Political Science
    5.00 (1)

    Over the centuries, societies have gradually developed constraints on the use of armed force in the conduct of foreign relations. The crowning achievement of these efforts occurred in the midtwentieth century with the general acceptance among the states of the world that the use of military force for territorial expansion was unacceptable. A central challenge for the twenty-first century rests in reconciling these constraints with the increasing desire to protect innocent persons from human rights deprivations that often take place during civil war or result from persecution by autocratic governments. Humanitarian Intervention is a detailed look at the historical development of constraints on the use of force and at incidents of humanitarian intervention prior to, during, and after the Cold War.

    Noam Chomsky

    One of the books he used as reference.

     — Source

  • Safe for Democracy
    Noam Chomsky

    One of the books he used as reference.

     — Source

  • The Great Transformation

    The Great Transformation

    The Great Transformation

    Karl Polanyi
    Philosophy
    4.20 (4,078)

    One of the twentieth century's most thorough and discerning historians, Karl Polanyi sheds "new illumination on . . . the social implications of a particular economic system, the market economy that grew into full stature in the nineteenth century." -R. M. MacIver

    Noam Chomsky

    One of the books he used as reference.

     — Source

  • A Preponderance of Power

    A Preponderance of Power

    A Preponderance of Power

    Melvyn P. Leffler
    History
    3.90 (80)

    This is the most comprehensive history to date of the Truman Administration's progressive embroilment in the cold war, and it presents a stunning new interpretation of U.S. national security policy during the formative stages of the Soviet-American rivalry. Illustrated with 15 halftones and 10 maps.

    Noam Chomsky

    One of the books he used as reference.

     — Source

  • Collateral Damage
    Noam Chomsky

    One of the books he used as reference.

     — Source

  • Israel's Border Wars, 1949-1956

    Israel's Border Wars, 1949-1956

    Israel's Border Wars, 1949-1956

    Benny Morris
    Causes
    4.07 (14)

    This revised and updated paperback edition of a highly successful study looks at the development of Israeli-Arab relations during the formative years 1949 to 1956, focusing on Arab infiltration into Israel and Israeli retaliation. Palestinian refugee raiding and cross-border attacks by Egyptian-controlled irregulars and commandos were a core phenomenon during this period and one of the chief causes of Israel's invasion of Sinai and the Gaza strip, the Israeli part of the Anglo-French-Israeli invasion of Egypt in 1956.; Benny Morris probes the types of Arab infiltration and the attitude of Arab governments towards the phenomenon, and traces the evolution of Israel's defensive and offensive responses. He analyses Israeli decision-making processes, including the emergence and ultimate failure of Foreign Minister Moshe Sharett's dissident policy of moderation and describes in detail the history of the Arab infiltration, including the terrorist-guerrilla raids by state-organized Fedayeen in 1955-6, and of the IDF raids against Sharafat, Beit Jala, Qibya, Gaza, the Syrian Sea of Galilee positions, and the Sabha.; This was a precedent-setting period in the making of Israeli defence policy, and this pattern of raiding and counter-raiding served to define Israeli-Arab relations during the subsequent three to four decades. In this revised and expanded paperback edition, Benny Morris deepens our understanding of the evolution of the Israeli-Arab conflict and of the crossroads at which a possible peace settlement was missed.

    Noam Chomsky

    One of the books he used as reference.

     — Source

  • Churchill

    Churchill

    Churchill

    Andrew Roberts
    4.12 (9,784)

    Winston Churchill towers over every other figure in twentieth-century British history. By the time of his death at the age of 90 in 1965, many thought him to be the greatest man in the world. There have been over a thousand previous biographies of Churchill. Andrew Roberts now draws on over forty new sources, including the private diaries of King George VI, used in no previous Churchill biography to depict him more intimately and persuasively than any of its predecessors. The book in no way conceals Churchill's faults and it allows the reader to appreciate his virtues and character in full- his titanic capacity for work (and drink), his ability see the big picture, his willingness to take risks and insistence on being where the action was, his good humour even in the most desperate circumstances, the breadth and strength of his friendships and his extraordinary propensity to burst into tears at unexpected moments. Above all, it shows us the wellsprings of his personality - his lifelong desire to please his father (even long after his father's death) but aristocratic disdain for the opinions of almost everyone else, his love of the British Empire, his sense of history and its connection to the present.

    Noam Chomsky

    One of the books he used as reference.

     — Source

  • Anarcho-Syndicalism

    Anarcho-Syndicalism

    Anarcho-Syndicalism

    Rudolf Rocker
    Philosophy
    3.96 (1,349)

    The greatest introduction to Anarchism and anarchist practice ever penned, by one of its' leading theoreticians.

    Noam Chomsky

    One of the books he used as reference.

     — Source

  • In Retrospect

    In Retrospect

    In Retrospect

    Robert Mcnamara
    Biography & Autobiography

    #1 NATIONAL BESTSELLER. The definitive insider's account of American policy making in Vietnam. "Can anyone remember a public official with the courage to confess error and explain where he and his country went wrong? This is what Robert McNamara does in this brave, honest, honorable, and altogether compelling book."—Arthur Schlesinger, Jr. Written twenty years after the end of the Vietnam War, former Secretary of Defense Robert McNamara's controversial memoir answers the lingering questions that surround this disastrous episode in American history. With unprecedented candor and drawing on a wealth of newly declassified documents, McNamara reveals the fatal misassumptions behind our involvement in Vietnam. Keenly observed and dramatically written, In Retrospect possesses the urgency and poignancy that mark the very best histories—and the unsparing candor that is the trademark of the greatest personal memoirs. Includes a preface written by McNamara for the paperback edition.

    Noam Chomsky

    One of the books he used as reference.

     — Source

  • European Empires
    Noam Chomsky

    One of the books he used as reference.

     — Source

  • After Such Knowledge, What Forgiveness?

    After Such Knowledge, What Forgiveness?

    After Such Knowledge, What Forgiveness?

    Jonathan C. Randal
    History
    3.77 (39)

    A firsthand account of the past and present history of the Kurds of the Middle East traces the power politics of the area, which have led to internecine warfare, poison gas attacks, and mass migrations among the Kurds.

    Noam Chomsky

    One of the books he used as reference.

     — Source

  • Al-Qaeda
    Noam Chomsky

    One of the books he used as reference.

     — Source

  • Taking the Risk Out of Democracy

    Taking the Risk Out of Democracy

    Taking the Risk Out of Democracy

    Alex Carey
    Language Arts & Disciplines
    4.33 (49)

    This compelling book examines the twentieth-century history of corporate propaganda as practiced by U.S. businesses and its export to and adoption by other western democracies, chiefly the United Kingdom and Australia.A volume in the series The History of Communication, edited by Robert W. McChesney and John C. Nerone

    Noam Chomsky

    One of the books he used as reference.

     — Source

  • Peace Denied
    Noam Chomsky

    One of the books he used as reference.

     — Source

  • The CIA

    The CIA

    The CIA

    William Blum
    United States

    "The CIA: a forgotten history tells the remarkable story of the CIA interventions in more thatn fifty countries, from the earliest actions in China to the present day campaign against Nicaragua. Investigative writer William Blum describes the grim role played by the Agency in overthrowing governments, preventing elections, assassinating leaders, suppressing revolutions, manipulating trade unions and manufacturing 'news' -- in detail that's never before appeared in one book. Blum also shows how the mainstream media have frequently not bothered to probe, highlight or even report many of America's aggressive actions abroad. Effectively, this has helped the US Government camoflague its operations and intentions abroad ever since World War II. Washington's deception and the media's laxity combine to leave us functionally illiterate about the history of modern US foreign policy. And that, the author believes, is good neither for democracy, nor for development and world peace. This immensely readable account has been carefully pieced together from widely disparate sources and with a scrupulous eye to documentation." --

    Noam Chomsky

    One of the books he used as reference.

     — Source

  • Collusion Across the Jordan

    Collusion Across the Jordan

    Collusion Across the Jordan

    Avi Shlaim
    Arab-Israeli conflict

    This book is an account of the highly secret relationship between Abdullah, the Hashemite ruler of Jordan, and the Zionist movement. Spanning three decades, from the appointment of Abdullah as Emir in 1921 to his assassination in 1951, this work focuses on the clandestine diplomacy and the political and military processes which determined the fate of Palestine between 1947 and 1950, and which left the Palestinian Arabs without a homeland.

    Noam Chomsky

    One of the books he used as reference.

     — Source

  • The Spanish Cockpit

    The Spanish Cockpit

    The Spanish Cockpit

    Franz Borkenau
    History
    4.14 (77)

    First published one year after the outbreak of the Spanish Civil War, and long out of print, this eyewitness account provides an insight into the political and social conflicts that no book written today can hope to achieve. Recognised by historians as a dress rehearsal for World War II, the Spanish Civil War drew romantics from all over the world to fight for the Republican cause. It has inspired and continues to inspire novelists, artists, historians, musicians, poets, movie makers, revolutionaries. Yet few were actually there to see for themselves. Franz Borkenau, a n idealistic young Austrian wrote (in English) this on the spot account of his visits to Spain in 1936 and 1937 - it became one of the most sought after classics and is now back in print for the first time in many years.

    Noam Chomsky

    One of the books he used as reference.

     — Source

  • Empire of Fortune

    Empire of Fortune

    Empire of Fortune

    Francis Jennings
    History

    "A riveting, massively documented epic [that] overturns textbook clichés.... This impassioned study throws valuable light on our history." --Publishers Weekly

    Noam Chomsky

    One of the books he used as reference.

     — Source

  • The United States and Fascist Italy, 1922-1940

    The United States and Fascist Italy, 1922-1940

    The United States and Fascist Italy, 1922-1940

    David F. Schmitz
    History

    A comprehensive analysis of American foreign policy and Mussolini's Italy. Schmitz argues that the U.S. desire for order, interest in Open Door trade, and concern about left-wing revolution led American policymakers to welcome Mussolini's coming to power and to support fascism in Italy for most of the interwar period. Originally published in 1988. A UNC Press Enduring Edition -- UNC Press Enduring Editions use the latest in digital technology to make available again books from our distinguished backlist that were previously out of print. These editions are published unaltered from the original, and are presented in affordable paperback formats, bringing readers both historical and cultural value.

    Noam Chomsky

    One of the books he used as reference.

     — Source

  • Facing West
    Noam Chomsky

    One of the books he used as reference.

     — Source

  • The Quality of Mercy
    Noam Chomsky

    One of the books he used as reference.

     — Source

  • Between Serb and Albanian

    Between Serb and Albanian

    Between Serb and Albanian

    Miranda Vickers
    Albanians

    This history of the contradictory aims and interests of Kosovo's two peoples, the Serbs and the Albanians, focuses on the underlying social and cultural factors affecting the conflict.

    Noam Chomsky

    One of the books he used as reference.

     — Source

  • Human Rights and United States Policy Toward Latin America

    Human Rights and United States Policy Toward Latin America

    Human Rights and United States Policy Toward Latin America

    Lars Schoultz
    Political Science
    2.67 (3)

    The role of human rights in United States policy toward Latin America is the subject of this study. It covers the early sixties to 1980, a period when humanitarian values came to play an important role in determining United States foreign policy. The author is concerned both with explaining why these values came to impinge on government decision making and how internal bureaucratic processes affected the specific content of United States policy. Originally published in 1981. The Princeton Legacy Library uses the latest print-on-demand technology to again make available previously out-of-print books from the distinguished backlist of Princeton University Press. These paperback editions preserve the original texts of these important books while presenting them in durable paperback editions. The goal of the Princeton Legacy Library is to vastly increase access to the rich scholarly heritage found in the thousands of books published by Princeton University Press since its founding in 1905.

    Noam Chomsky

    One of the books he used as reference.

     — Source

  • 1984

    1984

    1984

    George Orwell
    Drama

    April, 1984. Winston Smith thinks a thought, starts a diary, and falls in love. But Big Brother is watching him, and the door to Room 101 can swing open in the blink of an eye. Its ideas have become our ideas, and Orwell's fiction is often said to be our reality. The definitive book of the 20th century is re-examined in a radical new adaptation exploring why Orwell's vision of the future is as relevant as ever.

    Noam Chomsky

    One of the books he used as reference.

     — Source

  • The Limits of State Action

    The Limits of State Action

    The Limits of State Action

    Wilhelm von Humboldt
    Political Science

    This text is important both as one of the most interesting contributions to the liberalism of the German Enlightenment, and as the most significant source for the ideas which John Stuart Mill popularized in his essay On Liberty. Humboldt's concern is to define the criteria by which the permissible limits of the state's activities may be determined. His basic principle, like that of Mill, is that the only justification for government interference is the prevention of harm to others. He discusses in detail the role and limits of the state's responsibility for the welfare, security and morals of its citizens. Humboldt's special achievement in this work is to enlarge our sense of what a liberal political theory might be by his particularly sensitive grasp of the complexity of our attitudes to and our need of other people. Dr Burrow has based his translation on Coulthard's version of 1854. In an important introduction, he provides a most perceptive as well as scholarly guide to Humboldt's political thought.

    Noam Chomsky

    One of the books he used as reference.

     — Source

  • Conflicting Missions

    Conflicting Missions

    Conflicting Missions

    Piero Gleijeses
    History
    4.33 (117)

    This is a compelling and dramatic account of Cuban policy in Africa from 1959 to 1976 and of its escalating clash with U.S. policy toward the continent. Piero Gleijeses's fast-paced narrative takes the reader from Cuba's first steps to assist Algerian rebels fighting France in 1961, to the secret war between Havana and Washington in Zaire in 1964-65--where 100 Cubans led by Che Guevara clashed with 1,000 mercenaries controlled by the CIA--and, finally, to the dramatic dispatch of 30,000 Cubans to Angola in 1975-76, which stopped the South African advance on Luanda and doomed Henry Kissinger's major covert operation there. Based on unprecedented archival research and firsthand interviews in virtually all of the countries involved--Gleijeses was even able to gain extensive access to closed Cuban archives--this comprehensive and balanced work sheds new light on U.S. foreign policy and CIA covert operations. It revolutionizes our view of Cuba's international role, challenges conventional U.S. beliefs about the influence of the Soviet Union in directing Cuba's actions in Africa, and provides, for the first time ever, a look from the inside at Cuba's foreign policy during the Cold War. "Fascinating . . . and often downright entertaining. . . . Gleijeses recounts the Cuban story with considerable flair, taking good advantage of rich material.--Washington Post Book World "Gleijeses's research . . . bluntly contradicts the Congressional testimony of the era and the memoirs of Henry A. Kissinger. . . . After reviewing Dr. Gleijeses's work, several former senior United States diplomats who were involved in making policy toward Angola broadly endorsed its conclusions.--New York Times "With the publication of Conflicting Missions, Piero Gleijeses establishes his reputation as the most impressive historian of the Cold War in the Third World. Drawing on previously unavailable Cuban and African as well as American sources, he tells a story that's full of fresh and surprising information. And best of all, he does this with a remarkable sensitivity to the perspectives of the protagonists. This book will become an instant classic.--John Lewis Gaddis, author of We Now Know: Rethinking Cold War History Based on unprecedented research in Cuban, American, and European archives, this is the compelling story of Cuban policy in Africa from 1959 to 1976 and of its escalating clash with U.S. policy toward the continent. Piero Gleijeses sheds new light on U.S. foreign policy and CIA covert operations, revolutionizes our view of Cuba's international role, and provides the first look from the inside at Cuba's foreign policy during the Cold War. -->

    Noam Chomsky

    One of the books he used as reference.

     — Source

  • The Long Peace
    Noam Chomsky

    One of the books he used as reference.

     — Source

  • Cambodia, 1975-1982

    Cambodia, 1975-1982

    Cambodia, 1975-1982

    Michael Vickery
    History
    3.68 (31)

    Cambodia 1975–1982presents a unique and carefully researched analysis of the Democratic Kampuchea regime of Pol Pot and the Khmer Rouge (1975–79) and the early years of the People's Republic of Kampuchea (1979–89). When it was first published in 1984, the book provided one of the few balanced and reasoned voices in a world shocked by media reports of incredible brutality. Now, 15 years later, the book remains unsurpassed as an original historical document bringing a new interpretation based on the earliest primary sources — interviews with the Khmer people themselves. "The most comprehensive and definitive political history to date of the Pol Pot regime in Cambodia. . . . Overall a balanced, judicious account."—Choice

    Noam Chomsky

    One of the books he used as reference.

     — Source

  • Power Without Responsibility

    Power Without Responsibility

    Power Without Responsibility

    James Curran,Jean Seaton
    Performing Arts
    3.96 (81)

    Widely regarded as the standard book on the British Media, this authoritative introduction to the history, sociology, theory and politics of media and communications studies has been substantially revised and updated to bring it up to date with developments in the media industry. Its three new chapters describe the battle for the soul of the internet, the impact of the internet on society and the rise of new media in Britain. In addition it examines the recuperation of the BBC, how international and European regulation is changing the British media and why Britain has the least trusted press in Europe.

    Noam Chomsky

    One of the books he used as reference.

     — Source

  • Bitter Fruit
    Noam Chomsky

    One of the books he used as reference.

     — Source

  • Viet Cong
    Noam Chomsky

    One of the books he used as reference.

     — Source

  • Voices of a People's History of the United States

    Voices of a People's History of the United States

    Voices of a People's History of the United States

    Anthony Arnove,Howard Zinn
    History
    4.32 (2,007)

    Here in their own words are Frederick Douglass, George Jackson, Chief Joseph, Martin Luther King Jr., Plough Jogger, Sacco and Vanzetti, Patti Smith, Bruce Springsteen, Mark Twain, and Malcolm X, to name just a few of the hundreds of voices that appear in Voices of a People's History of the United States, edited by Howard Zinn and Anthony Arnove. Paralleling the twenty-four chapters of Zinn's A People's History of the United States, Voices of a People’s History is the long-awaited companion volume to the national bestseller. For Voices, Zinn and Arnove have selected testimonies to living history—speeches, letters, poems, songs—left by the people who make history happen but who usually are left out of history books—women, workers, nonwhites. Zinn has written short introductions to the texts, which range in length from letters or poems of less than a page to entire speeches and essays that run several pages. Voices of a People’s History is a symphony of our nation’s original voices, rich in ideas and actions, the embodiment of the power of civil disobedience and dissent wherein lies our nation’s true spirit of defiance and resilience.

    Noam Chomsky

    One of the books he used as reference.

     — Source

  • The United States and the Origins of the Cuban Revolution

    The United States and the Origins of the Cuban Revolution

    The United States and the Origins of the Cuban Revolution

    Jules R. Benjamin
    History
    4.17 (6)

    Jules Benjamin argues convincingly that modern conflicts between Cuba and the United States stem from a long history of U.S. hegemony and Cuban resistance. He shows what difficulties the smaller country encountered because of U.S. efforts first to make it part of an "empire of liberty" and later to dominate it by economic methods, and he analyzes the kind of misreading of ardent nationalism that continues to plague U.S. policymaking.

    Noam Chomsky

    One of the books he used as reference.

     — Source

  • Washington's War on Nicaragua

    Washington's War on Nicaragua

    Washington's War on Nicaragua

    Holly Sklar
    Political Science
    4.22 (18)

    An account of U.S. policy from the Sandinista revolution through the Iran-contra scandal and beyond. Sklar shows how the White House sabotaged peace negoatiations and sustained the deadly contra war despite public opposition, with secret U.S. special forces and an auxiliary arm of dictators, drug smugglers and death squad godfathers, and illuminates an alternative policy rooted in law and democracy.

    Noam Chomsky

    One of the books he used as reference.

     — Source

  • Out Of Control

    Out Of Control

    Out Of Control

    Kevin Kelly
    Business & Economics

    This is a book about how our manufactured world has become so complex that the only way to create yet more complex things is by using the principles of biology. This means decentralized, bottom up control, evolutionary advances and error-honoring institutions. I also get into the new laws of wealth in a network-based economy, what the Biosphere 2 project in Arizona has or has not to teach us, and whether large systems can predict or be predicted. And more: restoration biology, encryption, a-life, and the lessons of hypertext. Yes, it's a romp, in 520 pages. But the best part, my friends tell me, is the 28-page annotated bibliography. If you have suspected that technology could be better, more life-like, then this book is for you. -- Product Description.

    Noam Chomsky

    One of the books he used as reference.

     — Source

  • Nicaragua
    Noam Chomsky

    One of the books he used as reference.

     — Source

  • Confronting the Third World

    Confronting the Third World

    Confronting the Third World

    Gabriel Kolko
    Political Science

    Very Good,No Highlights or Markup,all pages are intact.

    Noam Chomsky

    One of the books he used as reference.

     — Source

  • Culture, Inc.

    Culture, Inc.

    Culture, Inc.

    Herbert I. Schiller
    History
    3.83 (30)

    Most Americans take for granted that they live in an open society with a free market of ideas. But as Herbert Schiller reveals in Culture, Inc., the corporate arm has reached into every corner of daily life, and from the shopping mall to the art gallery, big-business influence has brought about some frightening changes in American culture. Examining the effects of fifty years worth of corporate growth on American culture, Schiller argues that corporate control over such arenas of culture as museums, theaters, performing arts centers, and public broadcasting stations has resulted in a broad manipulation of consciousness as well as an insidious form of censorship. A disturbing but enlightening picture of corporate America, Culture, Inc. exposes the agenda and methods of the corporate cultural takeover, reveals the growing threat to free access to information at home and abroad, shows how independent channels of expression have been greatly restricted, and explains how the few keep managing to benefit from the many.

    Noam Chomsky

    One of the books he used as reference.

     — Source

  • The Discovery of India

    The Discovery of India

    The Discovery of India

    Jawaharlal Nehru
    India
    4.06 (7,262)

    Gives an understanding of the glorious intellectual and spiritual tradition of (a) great country.' Albert Einstein Written over five months when Jawaharlal Nehru was imprisoned in the Ahmadnagar Fort, The Discovery of India has acquired the status of a classic since it was first published in 1946. In this work of prodigious scope and scholarship, one of the greatest figures of Indian history unfolds the panorama of the country's rich and complex past, from prehistory to the last years of British colonial rule. Analysing texts like the Vedas and the Arthashastra, and personalities like the Buddha and Mahatma Gandhi, Nehru brings alive an ancient culture that has seen the flowering of the world's great traditions of philosophy, science and art, and almost all its major religions. Nehru's brilliant intellect, deep humanity and lucid style make The Discovery of India essential reading for anyone interested in India, both its past and its present.

    Noam Chomsky

    One of the books he used as reference.

     — Source

  • No Gods No Masters
    Noam Chomsky

    One of the books he used as reference.

     — Source

  • Panic Rules!

    Panic Rules!

    Panic Rules!

    Robin Hahnel
    Business & Economics
    3.60 (45)

    A witty and accessible manual to the global economic crisis.

    Noam Chomsky

    One of the books he used as reference.

     — Source

  • Ruthless Criticism
    Noam Chomsky

    One of the books he used as reference.

     — Source

  • The Uncensored War

    The Uncensored War

    The Uncensored War

    Daniel C. Hallin
    History
    3.80 (65)

    Vietnam was America's most divisive and unsuccessful foreign war. It was also the first to be televised and the first of the modern era fought without military censorship. From the earliest days of the Kennedy-Johnson escalation right up to the American withdrawal, and even today, the media's role in Vietnam has continued to be intensely controversial. The "Uncensored War" gives a richly detailed account of what Americans read and watched about Vietnam. Hallin draws on the complete body of the New York Times coverage from 1961 to 1965, a sample of hundreds of television reports from 1965-73, including television coverage filmed by the Defense Department in the early years of the war, and interviews with many of the journalists who reported it, to give a powerful critique of the conventional wisdom, both conservative and liberal, about the media and Vietnam. Far from being a consistent adversary of government policy in Vietnam, Hallin shows, the media were closely tied to official perspectives throughout the war, though divisions in the government itself and contradictions in its public relations policies caused every administration, at certain times, to lose its ability to "manage" the news effectively. As for television, it neither showed the "literal horror of war," nor did it play a leading role in the collapse of support: it presented a highly idealized picture of the war in the early years, and shifted toward a more critical view only after public unhappiness and elite divisions over the war were well advanced.

    Noam Chomsky

    One of the books he used as reference.

     — Source

  • The Wealth of Nations

    The Wealth of Nations

    The Wealth of Nations

    Adam Smith
    3.85 (32,635)

    The first--and still the most eloquent--expression of the economic theories of capitalism. Published in 1776, in the same year as the Declaration of Independence, The Wealth of Nations has had a similarly significant impact on the course of modern history. Adam Smith's celebrated defense of free market economies was written with such expressive power and clarity that the first edition sold out in six months. While its most remarkable and enduring innovation was to see the whole of economic life as a unified system, it is notable also as one of the Enlightenment's most eloquent testaments to the sanctity of the individual in his relation to the state. This edition contains in one volume the most influential first four books of Smith's masterwork.

    Noam Chomsky

    One of the books he used as reference.

     — Source

  • The Kennedy Tapes
    Noam Chomsky

    One of the books he used as reference.

     — Source

  • Expulsion of the Palestinians
    Noam Chomsky

    One of the books he used as reference.

     — Source

  • Last Reflections On a War
    Noam Chomsky

    One of the books he used as reference.

     — Source

  • Web Of Deceit

    Web Of Deceit

    Web Of Deceit

    Mark Curtis
    Political Science

    In his revealing book, Mark Curtis reasons that Britain is a 'rogue state', often a violator of international law and a sytematic condoner of human rights abuses, as well as a key ally of many repressive regimes.

    Noam Chomsky

    One of the books he used as reference.

     — Source

  • The Real Terror Network

    The Real Terror Network

    The Real Terror Network

    Edward S. Herman
    Political Science
    4.14 (36)

    A devastating expose of U.S. foreign policy which separates the myth of an "international terrorist conspiracy" from the reality.

    Noam Chomsky

    One of the books he used as reference.

     — Source

  • The American Occupation of Japan

    The American Occupation of Japan

    The American Occupation of Japan

    Michael Schaller
    History

    In this novel and intriguing book, Michael Schaller traces the origins of the Cold War in Asia to the postwar occupation of Japan by U.S. troops. Determined to secure Japan as a bulwark against both Soviet expansion and Asian revolution, the U.S. instituted ambitious social and economic reforms under the direction of the flamboyant Occupation Commander, General Douglas MacArthur. MacArthur was later denounced by the Truman Administration as a "bunko artist" who had wrecked Japan's economy and opened it to Communist influence, and power was shifted to Japan's old elite. Cut off from its former trading partners, which were now all Communist-controlled, Japan, with U.S. backing, turned its attention to the rich but unstable Southeast Asian states. The stage was thus set for U.S. intervention in China, Korea, and Vietnam.

    Noam Chomsky

    One of the books he used as reference.

     — Source

  • The Making of the Arab-Israeli Conflict, 1947-1951

    The Making of the Arab-Israeli Conflict, 1947-1951

    The Making of the Arab-Israeli Conflict, 1947-1951

    Ilan Pappé
    History
    4.27 (41)

    Describes the first Arab-Israeli war of 1948 in different ways. This book integrates archival material with the findings of scholarship to present the reader with a comprehensive and general history of the origins and consequences of the 1948 war.

    Noam Chomsky

    One of the books he used as reference.

     — Source

  • Exporting Democracy

    Exporting Democracy

    Exporting Democracy

    Abraham F. Lowenthal
    Political Science
    3.11 (9)

    Lowenthal, The United States and Latin American Democracy: Learning from History.

    Noam Chomsky

    One of the books he used as reference.

     — Source

  • Politicide

    Politicide

    Politicide

    Baruch Kimmerling
    Political Science
    3.68 (41)

    A compelling history of Sharon's rise to power, and a forensic account of his crimes against the Palestinians.

    Noam Chomsky

    One of the books he used as reference.

     — Source

  • Das Kapital

    Das Kapital

    Das Kapital

    Karl Marx
    Political Science
    3.87 (8,774)

    One of the most notorious works of modern times, as well as one of the most influential, Capital is an incisive critique of private property and the social relations it generates. Living in exile in England, where this work was largely written, Marx drew on a wide-ranging knowledge of its society to support his analysis and generate fresh insights. Arguing that capitalism would create an ever-increasing division in wealth and welfare, he predicted its abolition and replacement by a system with common ownership of the means of production. Capital rapidly acquired readership among the leaders of social democratic parties, particularly in Russia and Germany, and ultimately throughout the world, to become a work described by Marx's friend and collaborator Friedrich Engels as 'the Bible of the Working Class'.

    Noam Chomsky

    One of the books he used as reference.

     — Source

  • Intervention

    Intervention

    Intervention

    George McTurnan Kahin
    History

    Traces the roots of American involvement in Vietnam and offers a provocative portrayal of Lydon Johnson's role in the Vietnam War

    Noam Chomsky

    One of the books he used as reference.

     — Source

  • Accumulation and Power
    Noam Chomsky

    One of the books he used as reference.

     — Source

  • The Age of Terror
    Noam Chomsky

    One of the books he used as reference.

     — Source

  • The Uses of Haiti

    The Uses of Haiti

    The Uses of Haiti

    Paul Farmer
    History

    A look at what has happened to the health of the poor in Haiti since the coup.

    Noam Chomsky

    One of the books he used as reference.

     — Source

  • Right Turn
    Noam Chomsky

    One of the books he used as reference.

     — Source

  • The Price of Power

    The Price of Power

    The Price of Power

    Seymour Hersh
    Political Science

    Price of Power examines Henry Kissinger’s influence on the development of the foreign policy of the United States during the presidency of Richard Nixon.

    Noam Chomsky

    One of the books he used as reference.

     — Source