Recommendations

  • The Philosopher Queens

    The Philosopher Queens

    The Philosopher Queens

    Lisa Whiting,Rebecca Buxton
    4.38 (392)

    The history of philosophy has not done women justice: you’ve probably heard the names plato, kant, nietzsche and locke – but what about hypatia, arendt, oluwole and young?the philosopher queens is a long-awaited book about the lives and works of women in philosophy by women in philosophy. this collection brings to centre stage twenty prominent women whose ideas have had a profound – but for the most part uncredited – impact on the world.you’ll learn about ban zhao, the first woman historian in ancient chinese history; angela davis, perhaps the

    Nigel Warburton

    This is the book of the year for me.

     — Source

  • A Theory of Jerks and Other Philosophical Misadventures

    A Theory of Jerks and Other Philosophical Misadventures

    A Theory of Jerks and Other Philosophical Misadventures

    Eric Schwitzgebel
    3.86 (37)

    Have you ever wondered about why some people are jerks? asked whether your driverless car should kill you so that others may live? found a robot adorable? considered the ethics of professional ethicists? reflected on the philosophy of hair? in this engaging, entertaining, and enlightening book, eric schwitzgebel turns a philosopher's eye on these and other burning questions. in a series of quirky and accessible short pieces that cover a mind-boggling variety of philosophical topics, schwitzgebel offers incisive takes on matters both small (the consciousness of garden snails) and large

    Nigel Warburton

    It's a really enjoyable book to dip into.

     — Source

  • The Infidel and the Professor

    The Infidel and the Professor

    The Infidel and the Professor

    Dennis C. Rasmussen
    4.1 (568)

    David hume is widely regarded as the most important philosopher ever to write in english, but during his lifetime he was attacked as "the great infidel" for his skeptical religious views and deemed unfit to teach the young. in contrast, adam smith was a revered professor of moral philosophy, and is now often hailed as the founding father of capitalism. remarkably, the two were best friends for most of their adult lives, sharing what dennis rasmussen calls the greatest of all philosophical friendships. the infidel and the professor is the

    Nigel Warburton

    This book is a really interesting, highly readable

     — Source

  • Down Girl

    Down Girl

    Down Girl

    Kate Manne
    4.25 (2,665)

    Misogyny is a hot topic, yet it's often misunderstood. what is misogyny, exactly? who deserves to be called a misogynist? how does misogyny contrast with sexism, and why is it prone to persist--or increase--even when sexist gender roles are waning? this book is an exploration of misogyny in public life and politics, by the moral philosopher and writer kate manne. it argues that misogyny should not be understood primarily in terms of the hatred or hostility some men feel toward women generally. rather, it's primarily about controlling, policing, punishing, and

    Nigel Warburton

    it's a really excellent book

     — Source

  • Galileo's Error

    Galileo's Error

    Galileo's Error

    Philip Goff
    3.97 (558)

    Understanding how brains produce consciousness is one of the great scientific challenges of our age. some philosophers argue that consciousness is something extra, beyond the physical workings of the brain. others think that if we persist in our standard scientific methods, our questions about consciousness will eventually be answered. and some even suggest that the mystery is so deep, it will never be solved. decades have been spent trying to explain consciousness from within our current scientific paradigm, but little progress has been made.now, philip goff offers an exciting alternative

    Nigel Warburton

    it's very skilfully written.

     — Source

  • The Complete Philosophy Files

    The Complete Philosophy Files

    The Complete Philosophy Files

    Daniel Postgate,Stephen Law
    4.09 (128)

    Is there a god, should i eat meat, where does the universe come from, could i live for ever as a robot? these are the big questions readers will be wrestling with in this thoroughly enjoyable book. dip into any chapter and you will find lively scenarios and dialogues to take you through philosophical puzzles ancient and modern, involving virtual reality, science fiction and a host of characters from this and other planets. the text is interspersed on every page with lively cartoons, and there is a list of philosophical

    Nigel Warburton

    Written in short, humorous, easy-to-read chapters

     — Source

  • Frank Ramsey

    Frank Ramsey

    Frank Ramsey

    Cheryl Misak
    4.25 (156)

    When he died in 1930 aged 26, frank ramsey had already invented one branch of mathematics and two branches of economics, laying the foundations for decision theory and game theory. keynes deferred to him; he was the only philosopher whom wittgenstein treated as an equal. had he lived he might have been recognized as the most brilliant thinker of the century. this amiable shambling bear of a man was an ardent socialist, a believer in free love, and an intimate of the bloomsbury set. for the first time cheryl misak

    Nigel Warburton

    The biography as a whole is really interesting.

     — Source

  • A Theory of the Aphorism

    A Theory of the Aphorism

    A Theory of the Aphorism

    Andrew Hui
    3.64 (28)

    Aphorisms-or philosophical short sayings-appear everywhere, from confucius to twitter, the buddha to the bible, heraclitus to nietzsche. yet despite this ubiquity, the aphorism is the least studied literary form. what are its origins? how did it develop? how do religious or philosophical movements arise from the enigmatic sayings of charismatic leaders? and why do some of our most celebrated modern philosophers use aphoristic fragments to convey their deepest ideas? in a theory of the aphorism, andrew hui crisscrosses histories and cultures to answer these questions and more.with clarity and precision,

    Nigel Warburton

    it's very, very rich in thought-provoking, isolated thoughts.

     — Source

  • Utilitarianism

    Utilitarianism

    Utilitarianism

    Katarzyna de Lazari-Radek,Peter Singer
    4.21 (191)

    Utilitarianism may well be the most influential secular ethical theory in the world today. it is also one of the most controversial. it clashes, or is widely thought to clash, with many conventional moral views, and with human rights when they are seen as inviolable. would it, for example, be right to torture a suspected terrorist in order to prevent an attack that could kill and injure a large number of innocent people? in this very short introduction peter singer and katarzyna de lazari-radek provide an authoritative account of the

    Nigel Warburton

    This book is quite brilliantly done. It's a very concise book

     — Source

  • Thinking, Fast and Slow

    Thinking, Fast and Slow

    Thinking, Fast and Slow

    Daniel Kahneman
    Psychology
    4.16 (389,431)

    In the highly anticipated thinking, fast and slow, kahneman takes us on a groundbreaking tour of the mind and explains the two systems that drive the way we think. system 1 is fast, intuitive, and emotional; system 2 is slower, more deliberative, and more logical. kahneman exposes the extraordinary capabilities—and also the faults and biases—of fast thinking, and reveals the pervasive influence of intuitive impressions on our thoughts and behavior. the impact of loss aversion and overconfidence on corporate strategies, the difficulties of predicting what will make us happy in

    Nigel Warburton

    It's a brilliant book

     — Source

  • The Path

    The Path

    The Path

    Christine Gross-Loh,Michael Puett
    3.73 (3,634)

    The first book of its kind, the path draws on the work of the great but largely unknown chinese philosophers to offer a profound guide to living well. by explaining what these teachings reveal about subjects from decision-making to relationships, it challenges some of our deepest held assumptions, forcing us to "unlearn" many ideas that inform modern society. the way we think we're living our lives isn't the way we live them.the authors show that we live well not by "finding" ourselves and slavishly following a grand plan, as so

    Nigel Warburton

    this book is both entertaining and challenging

     — Source

  • Black Box Thinking

    Black Box Thinking

    Black Box Thinking

    Matthew Syed
    4.31 (9,448)

    Whether developing a new product, honing a core skill or just trying to get a critical decision right, black box thinkers aren't afraid to face up to mistakes. in fact, black box thinkers see failure as the very best way to learn. rather than denying their mistakes, blaming others, or attempting to spin their way out of trouble, these institutions and individuals interrogate errors as part of their future strategy for success.how many of us can say that we have such a healthy relationship with failure? learning from failure has

    Nigel Warburton

    This book is really interesting.

     — Source

  • Ethics in the Real World

    Ethics in the Real World

    Ethics in the Real World

    Peter Singer
    3.94 (3,180)

    Peter singer is often described as the world's most influential philosopher. he is also one of its most controversial. the author of important books such as "animal liberation," "practical ethics," "rethinking life and death," and "the life you can save," he helped launch the animal rights and effective altruism movements and contributed to the development of bioethics. now, in "ethics in the real world," singer shows that he is also a master at dissecting important current events in a few hundred words.in this book of brief essays, he applies his

    Nigel Warburton

    For me, Peter Singer is one of the best stylists alive in philosophy.

     — Source

  • The Art of Thinking Clearly

    The Art of Thinking Clearly

    The Art of Thinking Clearly

    Rolf Dobelli,อรพิน ผลพนิชรัศมี
    3.84 (28,460)

    In engaging prose and with practical examples and anecdotes, an eye-opening look at human reasoning and essential reading for anyone with important decisions to make.have you ever:• invested time in something that, with hindsight, just wasn't worth it?• overpayed in an ebay auction?• continued doing something you knew was bad for you?• sold stocks too late, or too early?• taken credit for success, but blamed failure on external circumstances?• backed the wrong horse?these are examples of cognitive biases, simple errors we all make in our day-to-day thinking. but by knowing

    Nigel Warburton

    It's a clever book, and I think it's definitely worth dipping into and coming back to.

     — Source

  • An Enquiry Concerning Human Understanding
    Nigel Warburton

    He's a brilliant writer, very witty, sometimes ironic

     — Source

  • Socrates in Love

    Socrates in Love

    Socrates in Love

    Armand D’Angour
    3.68 (161)

    Socrates: the philosopher whose questioning gave birth to the foundations of western thought, and whose execution marked the end of the athenian golden age. yet despite his pre-eminence among the great thinkers of history, little of his life story is known. what we know tends to begin in his middle age and end with his trial and death. our conception of socrates has relied upon plato and xenophon--men who met him when he was in his fifties, a well-known figure in war-torn athens.there is mystery at the heart of socrates's

    Nigel Warburton

    I found Socrates in Love completely fascinating. It's a very readable book

     — Source

  • Philosophical Investigations

    Philosophical Investigations

    Philosophical Investigations

    G.E.M. Anscombe,Ludwig Wittgenstein
    Philosophy
    4.24 (13,426)

    Nigel Warburton

    it's very rich as a stimulus to other people's thought

     — Source

  • The Meaning of Travel

    The Meaning of Travel

    The Meaning of Travel

    Emily Thomas
    3.46 (154)

    "this is the finest kind of travel: not just across continents, but through time, space and our infinite minds. the journey is the joy, and emily thomas a terrific guide." - mike parkerhow can we think more deeply about our travels?this was the question that inspired emily thomas' journey into the philosophy of travel. part philosophical ramble, part travelogue, the meaning of travel begins in the age of discovery, when philosophers first started taking travel seriously. it meanders forward to consider montaigne on otherness, john locke on cannibals, and henry

    Nigel Warburton

    original and fun book

     — Source

  • The Meaning of Belief

    The Meaning of Belief

    The Meaning of Belief

    Tim Crane
    3.67 (150)

    "[a] lucid and thoughtful book... in a spirit of reconciliation, crane proposes to paint a more accurate picture of religion for his fellow unbelievers." --contemporary debate about religion seems to be going nowhere. atheists persist with their arguments, many plausible and some unanswerable, but these make no impact on religious believers. defenders of religion find atheists equally unwilling to cede ground. the meaning of belief offers a way out of this stalemate.an atheist himself, tim crane writes that there is a fundamental flaw with most atheists' basic approach: religion is

    Nigel Warburton

    the book is stimulating, it's a nice, short, easy read and it's something new.

     — Source

  • How to Be a Stoic

    How to Be a Stoic

    How to Be a Stoic

    Massimo Pigliucci
    4.04 (6,730)

    Who am i?what am i doing?how ought i to live my life?stoicism teaches us to acknowledge our emotions, reflect on what causes them and redirect them for our own good. whenever we worry about how to be happy, we are worrying about how to lead a good life. no goal seems more elusive.massimo pigliucci explores this remarkable philosophy and how its wisdom can be applied to our everyday lives in the quest for meaning. he shows how stoicism teaches us the importance of a person’s character, integrity and compassion.whoever we

    Nigel Warburton

    The book is written in a very accessible way.

     — Source

  • Calling Bullshit

    Calling Bullshit

    Calling Bullshit

    Carl T. Bergstrom,Jevin West
    4.16 (2,240)

    It's increasingly difficult to know what's true. misinformation, disinformation, and fake news abound. our media environment has become hyperpartisan. science is conducted by press release. startup culture elevates bullshit to high art. we are fairly well equipped to spot the sort of old-school bullshit that is based in fancy rhetoric and weasel words, but most of us don't feel qualified to challenge the avalanche of new-school bullshit presented in the language of math, science, or statistics. in calling bullshit, professors carl bergstrom and jevin west give us a set of

    Nigel Warburton

    It's a lively read. It covers not just verbal bullshit

     — Source

  • The Murder of Professor Schlick

    The Murder of Professor Schlick

    The Murder of Professor Schlick

    David Edmonds
    4.16 (159)

    On june 22, 1936, the philosopher moritz schlick was on his way to deliver a lecture at the university of vienna when johann nelböck, a deranged former student of schlick's, shot him dead on the university steps. some austrian newspapers defended the madman, while nelböck himself argued in court that his onetime teacher had promoted a treacherous jewish philosophy. david edmonds traces the rise and fall of the vienna circle--an influential group of brilliant thinkers led by schlick--and of a philosophical movement that sought to do away with metaphysics and

    Nigel Warburton

    This is a book that's accessible to a general reader.

     — Source

  • How to Live

    How to Live

    How to Live

    Sarah Bakewell
    3.91 (10,101)

    How to get on well with people, how to deal with violence, how to adjust to losing someone you love--such questions arise in most people's lives. they are all versions of a bigger question: how do you live? how do you do the good or honourable thing, while flourishing and feeling happy? this question obsessed renaissance writers, none more than michel eyquem de montaigne (1533-92), perhaps the first truly modern individual. a nobleman, public official, and wine-grower, he wrote free-roaming explorations of his thought and experience, unlike anything written before.

    Nigel Warburton

    immensely satisfying to read.

     — Source

  • Factfulness

    Factfulness

    Factfulness

    Anna Rosling Rönnlund,Hans Rosling,Ola Rosling
    4.34 (150,713)

    When asked simple questions about global trends—what percentage of the world’s population live in poverty; why the world’s population is increasing; how many girls finish school—we systematically get the answers wrong. so wrong that a chimpanzee choosing answers at random will consistently outguess teachers, journalists, nobel laureates, and investment bankers.in factfulness, professor of international health and global ted phenomenon hans rosling, together with his two long-time collaborators, anna and ola, offers . they reveal —from our tendency to divide the world into two camps (usually some version of us and

    Nigel Warburton

    It's an interesting book; it's very challenging.

     — Source

  • Metazoa

    Metazoa

    Metazoa

    Peter Godfrey-Smith
    3.91 (811)

    Dip below the ocean’s surface and you are soon confronted by forms of life that could not seem more foreign to our own: sea sponges, soft corals, and serpulid worms, whose rooted bodies, intricate geometry, and flower-like appendages are more reminiscent of plant life or even architecture than anything recognizably animal. yet these creatures are our cousins. as fellow members of the animal kingdom—the metazoa—they can teach us much about the evolutionary origins of not only our bodies, but also our minds.in his acclaimed 2016 book, other minds, the philosopher

    Nigel Warburton

    I found reading the book stimulated me visually.

     — Source

  • The Dream of Enlightenment

    The Dream of Enlightenment

    The Dream of Enlightenment

    Anthony Gottlieb
    4.07 (985)

    In a short period - from the early 1640s to the eve of the french revolution - descartes, hobbes, spinoza, locke, leibniz, and hume all made their mark on western thought. the dream of enlightenment tells their story and that of the birth of modern philosophy. what does the advance of science entail for our understanding of ourselves and for our ideas of god? how should a government deal with religious diversity - and what is government actually for? their questions remain our questions, and it is tempting to think

    Nigel Warburton

    it's a book that required a very light touch to pull off in such a successful way.

     — Source

  • The Life You Can Save

    The Life You Can Save

    The Life You Can Save

    Peter Singer
    Philosophy
    4.16 (5,063)

    It is 2021 and the world has experienced unimaginable suffering, death and despair. the pandemic has had a devastating effect on global extreme poverty and harrowing scenes from around the world continue to leave us shocked. as the pandemic rages on, it’s natural to ask: how can i help? peter singer – often considered to be the world’s most influential living philosopher– answers this question in the 10th anniversary edition of his seminal book, the life you can save. this book will inspire and empower readers to act now and

    Nigel Warburton

    Singer is brilliant because you don't have to agree with him

     — Source

  • Mean Girl

    Mean Girl

    Mean Girl

    Lisa Duggan
    3.74 (244)

    Ayn rand’s complicated notoriety as popular writer, leader of a political and philosophical cult, reviled intellectual, and ostentatious public figure endured beyond her death in 1982. in the twenty-first century, she has been resurrected as a serious reference point for mainstream figures, especially those on the political right from paul ryan to donald trump. mean girl follows rand’s trail through the twentieth century from the russian revolution to the cold war and traces her posthumous appeal and the influence of her novels via her cruel, surly, sexy heroes. outlining the

    Nigel Warburton

    short, very readable book

     — Source

  • Hiking with Nietzsche

    Hiking with Nietzsche

    Hiking with Nietzsche

    John Kaag
    3.67 (2,084)

    Hiking with nietzsche: becoming who you are is a tale of two philosophical journeys--one made by john kaag as an introspective young man of nineteen, the other seventeen years later, in radically different circumstances: he is now a husband and father, and his wife and small child are in tow. kaag sets off for the swiss peaks above sils maria where nietzsche wrote his landmark work thus spoke zarathustra. both of kaag's journeys are made in search of the wisdom at the core of nietzsche's philosophy, yet they deliver him

    Nigel Warburton

    It's quite a shocking book, in some ways

     — Source

  • How to Live a Good Life

    How to Live a Good Life

    How to Live a Good Life

    Daniel Kaufman,Massimo Pigliucci,Skye Cleary
    3.72 (541)

    Socrates famously said "the unexamined life is not worth living," but what does it mean to truly live philosophically?this thought-provoking, wide-ranging collection brings together essays by fifteen leading philosophers reflecting on what it means to live according to a philosophy of life. from eastern philosophies (daoism, confucianism, and buddhism) and classical western philosophies (such as aristotelianism and stoicism), to the four major religions, as well as contemporary philosophies (such as existentialism and effective altruism), each contributor offers a lively, personal account of how they find meaning in the practice of

    Nigel Warburton

    An antidote to Rand's is How to Live a Good Life

     — Source

  • Plato's Republic

    Plato's Republic

    Plato's Republic

    Angie Hobbs
    3.65 (26)

    - why do humans form societies and what is needed for them to thrive?- how can women's potential be actualized?- how can we protect ourselves from demagogues and tyrants?immerse yourself in the strikingly relevant questions of plato's influential dialogue, exploring the age old dilemma: why should i be just? what is a just society, and how can it be created?accessible. authoritative. timely.written by distinguished philosopher and professor angie hobbs, plato's republic is the essential introduction to a text that helped shape all western literature and philosophy.

    Nigel Warburton

    I'd like to recommend a Ladybird book

     — Source

  • Critical Thinking
    Nigel Warburton

    It's clearly written and accessible

     — Source

  • What Does It All Mean? A Very Short Introduction to Philosophy

    What Does It All Mean? A Very Short Introduction to Philosophy

    What Does It All Mean? A Very Short Introduction to Philosophy

    Thomas Nagel
    3.65 (3,798)

    In this cogent and accessible introduction to philosophy, the distinguished author of mortal questions and the view from nowhere sets forth the central problems of philosophical inquiry for the beginning student. arguing that the best way to learn about philosophy is to think about itsquestions directly, thomas nagel considers possible solutions to nine problems--knowledge of the world beyond our minds, knowledge of other minds, the mind-body problem, free will, the basis of morality, right and wrong, the nature of death, the meaning of life, and the meaning of words. althoughhe

    Nigel Warburton

    It's perfect for someone who wants to find out what philosophy is all about.

     — Source

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