Recommendations

  • Metaphors We Live By

    Metaphors We Live By

    Metaphors We Live By

    George Lakoff,Mark Johnson
    4.09 (5,427)

    The now-classic metaphors we live by changed our understanding of metaphor and its role in language and the mind. metaphor, the authors explain, is a fundamental mechanism of mind, one that allows us to use what we know about our physical and social experience to provide understanding of countless other subjects. because such metaphors structure our most basic understandings of our experience, they are "metaphors we live by", metaphors that can shape our perceptions and actions without our ever noticing them.in this updated edition of lakoff and johnson's influential book,

    Nick Szabo

    Some of the most important books I've read.

    Jan 31, 2016 — Source

  • An Inquiry into the Nature and Causes of the Wealth of Nations

    An Inquiry into the Nature and Causes of the Wealth of Nations

    An Inquiry into the Nature and Causes of the Wealth of Nations

    Adam Smith
    3.85 (33,638)

    Adam smith's masterpiece, first published in 1776, is the foundation of modern economic thought and remains the single most important account of the rise of, and the principles behind, modern capitalism. written in clear and incisive prose, the wealth of nations articulates the concepts indispensable to an understanding of contemporary society; and robert reich's introduction both clarifies smith's analyses and illuminates his overall relevance to the world in which we live. as reich writes, "smith's mind ranged over issues as fresh and topical today as they were in the late

    Nick Szabo

    Some of the most important books I've read.

    Jan 31, 2016 — Source

  • The Fatal Conceit

    The Fatal Conceit

    The Fatal Conceit

    Friedrich A. Hayek,W.W. Bartley III
    4.25 (2,000)

    Hayek gives the main arguments for the free-market case and presents his manifesto on the "errors of socialism." hayek argues that socialism has, from its origins, been mistaken on factual, and even on logical, grounds and that its repeated failures in the many different practical applications of socialist ideas that this century has witnessed were the direct outcome of these errors. he labels as the "fatal conceit" the idea that "man is able to shape the world around him according to his wishes.""the achievement of the fatal conceit is that

    Nick Szabo

    Some of the most important books I've read.

    Jan 31, 2016 — Source

  • The 10,000 Year Explosion
    Nick Szabo

    Three crucial books on our origins & our natures.

    Sep 7, 2016 — Source

  • Getting to Maybe

    Getting to Maybe

    Getting to Maybe

    Richard Michael Fischl
    3.78 (1,122)

    Professors fischl and paul explain law school exams in ways no one has before, all with an eye toward improving the reader's performance. the book begins by describing the difference between educational cultures that praise students for "right answers" and the law school culture that rewards nuanced analysis of ambiguous situations in which more than one approach may be correct. enormous care is devoted to explaining precisely how and why legal analysis frequently produces such perplexing situations. but the authors don't stop with mere description. instead, getting to maybe teaches

    Nick Szabo

    Nominally a book on how to take a law school exam.

    Jun 15, 2017 — Source

  • To Rule the Waves

    To Rule the Waves

    To Rule the Waves

    Arthur Herman
    History
    4.17 (1,313)

    To rule the waves tells the extraordinary story of how the british royal navy allowed one nation to rise to a level of power unprecedented in history. from the navy's beginnings under henry viii to the age of computer warfare and special ops, historian arthur herman tells the spellbinding tale of great battles at sea, heroic sailors, violent conflict, and personal tragedy -- of the way one mighty institution forged a nation, an empire, and a new world.this p.s. edition features an extra 16 pages of insights into the book,

    Nick Szabo

    Recommended on twitter

    Mar 28, 2018 — Source

  • The Printing Revolution in Early Modern Europe

    The Printing Revolution in Early Modern Europe

    The Printing Revolution in Early Modern Europe

    Elizabeth L. Eisenstein
    Business & Economics
    3.75 (366)

    What difference did printing make? although the importance of the advent of printing for the western world has long been recognized, it was elizabeth eisenstein in her monumental, two-volume work, the printing press as an agent of change, who provided the first full-scale treatment of the subject. this illustrated and abridged edition provides a stimulating survey of the communications revolution of the fifteenth century. after summarizing the initial changes, and introducing the establishment of printing shops, it considers how printing effected three major cultural movements: the renaissance, the reformation, and

    Nick Szabo

    Recommended on twitter

    Mar 28, 2018 — Source

  • The Fourth Part of the World

    The Fourth Part of the World

    The Fourth Part of the World

    Toby Lester
    History
    4.07 (1,270)

    "old maps lead you to strange and unexpected places, and none does so more ineluctably than the subject of this book: the giant, beguiling waldseemuller world map of 1507." so begins this remarkable story of the map that gave america its name. for millennia europeans believed that the world consisted of three parts: europe, africa, and asia. they drew the three continents in countless shapes and sizes on their maps, but occasionally they hinted at the existence of a "fourth part of the world," a mysterious, inaccessible place, separated from

    Nick Szabo

    Recommended on twitter

    Mar 28, 2018 — Source

  • The Most Powerful Idea in the World

    The Most Powerful Idea in the World

    The Most Powerful Idea in the World

    William Rosen
    Business & Economics
    3.91 (1,246)

    If all measures of human advancement in the last hundred centuries were plotted on a graph, they would show an almost perfectly flat line—until the eighteenth century, when the industrial revolution would cause the line to shoot straight up, beginning an almost uninterrupted march of progress. in , william rosen tells the story of the men responsible for the industrial revolution and the machine that drove it—the steam engine. in the process he tackles the question that has obsessed historians ever since: what made eighteenth-century britain such fertile soil for

    Nick Szabo

    Recommended on twitter

    Mar 28, 2018 — Source

  • Money Changes Everything

    Money Changes Everything

    Money Changes Everything

    William N. Goetzmann
    Business & Economics
    4.01 (292)

    In the aftermath of recent financial crises, it's easy to see finance as a wrecking ball: something that destroys fortunes and jobs, and undermines governments and banks. in money changes everything, leading financial historian william goetzmann argues the exact opposite--that the development of finance has made the growth of civilizations possible. goetzmann explains that finance is a time machine, a technology that allows us to move value forward and backward through time; and that this innovation has changed the very way we think about and plan for the future. he

    Nick Szabo

    Recommended on twitter

    Mar 28, 2018 — Source

  • The Black Book of Communism

    The Black Book of Communism

    The Black Book of Communism

    Andrzej Paczkowski,Karel Bartosek,Stéphane Courtois
    4.01 (875)

    Already famous throughout europe, this international bestseller plumbs recently opened archives in the former soviet bloc to reveal the actual, practical accomplishments of communism around the world: terror, torture, famine, mass deportations, and massacres. astonishing in the sheer detail it amasses, the book is the first comprehensive attempt to catalogue and analyze the crimes of communism over seventy years.revolutions, like trees, must be judged by their fruit, ignazio silone wrote, and this is the standard the authors apply to the communist experience--in the china of the great helmsman, kim il

    Nick Szabo

    Recommended on twitter

    Mar 28, 2018 — Source

  • The Measure of Reality

    The Measure of Reality

    The Measure of Reality

    Alfred W. Crosby
    3.82 (251)

    Western europeans were among the first, if not the first, to invent mechanical clocks, geometrically precise maps, double-entry bookkeeping, precise algebraic and musical notations, and perspective painting. more people in western europe thought quantitatively in the sixteenth century than in any other part of the world, enabling them to become the world's leaders. with amusing detail and historical anecdote, alfred crosby discusses the shift from qualitative to quantitative perception that occurred during the late middle ages and renaissance. alfred w. crosby is the author of five books, including the award-winning

    Nick Szabo

    Recommended on twitter

    Mar 28, 2018 — Source

  • A History of Western Technology

    A History of Western Technology

    A History of Western Technology

    Friedrich Klemm
    Industrial arts
    3 (4)

    This history of technology from graeco-roman times through the early twentieth century is told through contemporary writings by technologists, churchmen, naturalists, poets, economists, and statesman. these writings reveal how historical circumstance altered the direction of technical development, and how the intellectual forces of a period influenced and were in turn modified by technical progress. topics covered include the position of technology in ancient greece; early christianity and technology; islamic technology; engineering artists in the renaissance; technical undertakings in the baroque period; eighteenth-century england's lead in technology ; the factory system

    Nick Szabo

    Recommended on twitter

    Mar 28, 2018 — Source

  • Masters of the Word

    Masters of the Word

    Masters of the Word

    William J. Bernstein
    History
    3.89 (230)

    William j. bernstein’s a splendid exchange: how trade shaped the world, an economist and financial times best book of the year, placed him firmly among the top flight of historians like jared diamond and bill bryson, capable of distilling major trends and reams of information into insightful, globe-spanning popular narrative. bernstein explains how new communication technologies and in particular our access to them, impacted human society. writing was born thousands of years ago in mesopotamia. spreading to sumer, and then egypt, this revolutionary tool allowed rulers to extend their control

    Nick Szabo

    Recommended on twitter

    Mar 28, 2018 — Source

  • A Splendid Exchange

    A Splendid Exchange

    A Splendid Exchange

    William J. Bernstein
    Political Science
    4.15 (2,756)

    A sweeping narrative history of world trade—-from sumer in 3000 bc to the firestorm over globalization today—-that brilliantly explores trade's colorful and contentious past and provides fresh insights into social, political, cultural, and economic history, as well as a timely assessment of trade's future.

    Nick Szabo

    Recommended on twitter

    Mar 28, 2018 — Source

  • The Columbian Exchange

    The Columbian Exchange

    The Columbian Exchange

    Alfred W. Crosby,John Robert McNeill
    3.97 (945)

    Thirty years ago, alfred crosby published a small work that illuminated a simple point, that the most important changes brought on by the voyages of columbus were not social or political, but biological in nature. the book told the story of how 1492 sparked the movement of organisms, both large and small, in both directions across the atlantic. this columbian exchange, between the old world and the new, changed the history of our planet drastically and forever.the book the columbian exchange changed the field of history drastically and forever as

    Nick Szabo

    He recommend the book.

    Jun 4, 2017 — Source

  • The Rational Optimist

    The Rational Optimist

    The Rational Optimist

    Matt Ridley
    Business & Economics
    3.98 (9,993)

    Life is getting better—and at an accelerating rate. food availability, income, and life span are up; disease, child mortality, and violence are down — all across the globe. though the world is far from perfect, necessities and luxuries alike are getting cheaper; population growth is slowing; africa is following asia out of poverty; the internet, the mobile phone, and container shipping are enriching people’s lives as never before. the pessimists who dominate public discourse insist that we will soon reach a turning point and things will start to get worse.

    Nick Szabo

    The book was mentioned by Naval but also recommended by Nick.

    Jun 4, 2017 — Source

  • The Red Queen

    The Red Queen

    The Red Queen

    Matt Ridley
    Psychology
    4.05 (15,862)

    Referring to lewis carroll's red queen from through the looking-glass, a character who has to keep running to stay in the same place, matt ridley demonstrates why sex is humanity's best strategy for outwitting its constantly mutating internal predators. the red queen answers dozens of other riddles of human nature and culture -- including why men propose marriage, the method behind our maddening notions of beauty, and the disquieting fact that a woman is more likely to conceive a child by an adulterous lover than by her husband. brilliantly written,

    Nick Szabo

    The book was mentioned by Naval but also recommended by Nick.

    Jun 4, 2017 — Source

  • The Origins of Virtue

    The Origins of Virtue

    The Origins of Virtue

    Matt Ridley
    Science
    4.02 (3,963)

    If, as darwin suggests, evolution relentlessly encourages the survival of the fittest, why are humans compelled to live in cooperative, complex societies? in this fascinating examination of the roots of human trust and virtue, a zoologist and former american editor of the reveals the results of recent studies that suggest that self-interest and mutual aid are not at all incompatible. in fact, he points out, our cooperative instincts may have evolved as part of mankind?s natural selfish behavior--by exchanging favors we can benefit ourselves as well as others.brilliantly orchestrating the

    Nick Szabo

    The book was mentioned by Naval but also recommended by Nick.

    Jun 4, 2017 — Source

  • Genome

    Genome

    Genome

    Matt Ridley
    Science
    4.05 (24,846)

    Nick Szabo

    The book was mentioned by Naval but also recommended by Nick.

    Jun 4, 2017 — Source