Jonathan Eisen's favorite books

  • Pandemic 1918

    Pandemic 1918

    Pandemic 1918

    Catharine Arnold
    History
    3.81 (1,899)

    Before AIDS or Ebola, there was the Spanish Flu — Catharine Arnold's gripping narrative, Pandemic 1918, marks the 100th anniversary of an epidemic that altered world history. In January 1918, as World War I raged on, a new and terrifying virus began to spread across the globe. In three successive waves, from 1918 to 1919, influenza killed more than 50 million people. German soldiers termed it Blitzkatarrh, British soldiers referred to it as Flanders Grippe, but world-wide, the pandemic gained the notorious title of “Spanish Flu”. Nowhere on earth escaped: the United States recorded 550,000 deaths (five times its total military fatalities in the war) while European deaths totaled over two million. Amid the war, some governments suppressed news of the outbreak. Even as entire battalions were decimated, with both the Allies and the Germans suffering massive casualties, the details of many servicemen’s deaths were hidden to protect public morale. Meanwhile, civilian families were being struck down in their homes. The City of Philadelphia ran out of gravediggers and coffins, and mass burial trenches had to be excavated with steam shovels. Spanish flu conjured up the specter of the Black Death of 1348 and the great plague of 1665, while the medical profession, shattered after five terrible years of conflict, lacked the resources to contain and defeat this new enemy. Through primary and archival sources, historian Catharine Arnold gives readers the first truly global account of the terrible epidemic.

    Jonathan Eisen

    This book is in his list of favorites.

    Mar 9, 2020 — Source

  • Flu

    Flu

    Flu

    Gina Kolata
    Social Science
    3.91 (7,065)

    The fascinating, true story of the world's deadliest disease. In 1918, the Great Flu Epidemic felled the young and healthy virtually overnight. An estimated forty million people died as the epidemic raged. Children were left orphaned and families were devastated. As many American soldiers were killed by the 1918 flu as were killed in battle during World War I. And no area of the globe was safe. Eskimos living in remote outposts in the frozen tundra were sickened and killed by the flu in such numbers that entire villages were wiped out. Scientists have recently rediscovered shards of the flu virus frozen in Alaska and preserved in scraps of tissue in a government warehouse. Gina Kolata, an acclaimed reporter for The New York Times, unravels the mystery of this lethal virus with the high drama of a great adventure story. Delving into the history of the flu and previous epidemics, detailing the science and the latest understanding of this mortal disease, Kolata addresses the prospects for a great epidemic recurring, and, most important, what can be done to prevent it.

    Jonathan Eisen

    This book is in his list of favorites.

    Mar 9, 2020 — Source

  • Level 4

    Level 4

    Level 4

    Joseph B. McCormick,Leslie Alan Horvitz,Susan Fisher-Hoch
    Biography & Autobiography
    3.98 (2,300)

    Donated.

    Jonathan Eisen

    This book is in his list of favorites.

    Mar 9, 2020 — Source

  • Virus

    Virus

    Virus

    Marilyn J. Roossinck
    Science
    4.23 (80)

    An essential illustrated guide to the 101 most fascinating viruses This stunningly illustrated book provides a rare window into the amazing, varied, and often beautiful world of viruses. Contrary to popular belief, not all viruses are bad for you. In fact, several are beneficial to their hosts, and many are crucial to the health of our planet. Virus offers an unprecedented look at 101 incredible microbes that infect all branches of life on Earth—from humans and other animals to insects, plants, fungi, and bacteria. Featuring hundreds of breathtaking color images throughout, this guide begins with a lively and informative introduction to virology. Here readers can learn about the history of this unique science, how viruses are named, how their genes work, how they copy and package themselves, how they interact with their hosts, how immune systems counteract viruses, and how viruses travel from host to host. The concise entries that follow highlight important or interesting facts about each virus. Learn about the geographic origins of dengue and why old tires and unused pots help the virus to spread. Read about Ebola, Zika, West Nile, Frog virus 3, the Tulip breaking virus, and many others—how they were discovered, what their hosts are, how they are transmitted, whether or not there is a vaccine, and much more. Each entry is easy to read and includes a graphic of the virus, and nearly every entry features a colorized image of the virus as seen through the microscope. Written by a leading authority, this handsomely illustrated guide reveals the unseen wonders of the microbial world. It will give you an entirely new appreciation for viruses.

    Jonathan Eisen

    This book is in his list of favorites.

    Mar 9, 2020 — Source

  • The Hot Zone

    The Hot Zone

    The Hot Zone

    Richard Preston
    Health & Fitness
    4.13 (103,500)

    The bestselling landmark account of the first emergence of the Ebola virus. Now a mini-series drama starring Julianna Margulies, Topher Grace, Liam Cunningham, James D'Arcy, and Noah Emmerich on National Geographic. A highly infectious, deadly virus from the central African rain forest suddenly appears in the suburbs of Washington, D.C. There is no cure. In a few days 90 percent of its victims are dead. A secret military SWAT team of soldiers and scientists is mobilized to stop the outbreak of this exotic "hot" virus. The Hot Zone tells this dramatic story, giving a hair-raising account of the appearance of rare and lethal viruses and their "crashes" into the human race. Shocking, frightening, and impossible to ignore, The Hot Zone proves that truth really is scarier than fiction.

    Jonathan Eisen

    This book is in his list of favorites.

    Mar 9, 2020 — Source

  • Beating Back the Devil

    Beating Back the Devil

    Beating Back the Devil

    Maryn McKenna
    Medical
    3.92 (1,925)

    The universal human instinct is to run from an outbreak of disease like Ebola. These doctors run toward it. Their job is to stop epidemics from happening. They are the disease detective corps of the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the federal agency that tracks and tries to prevent disease outbreaks and bioterrorist attacks around the world. They are formally called the Epidemic Intelligence Service (EIS)—a group founded more than fifty years ago out of fear that the Korean War might bring the use of biological weapons—and, like intelligence operatives in the traditional sense, they perform their work largely in anonymity. They are not household names, but over the years they were first to confront the outbreaks that became known as hantavirus, Ebola, and AIDS. Every day they work to protect us by hunting down the deadly threats that we forget until they dominate our headlines, West Nile virus, anthrax, and SARS among others. In this riveting narrative, Maryn McKenna—the only journalist ever given full access to the EIS in its fifty-three-year history—follows the first class of disease detectives to come to the CDC after September 11, the first to confront not just naturally occurring outbreaks but the man-made threat of bioterrorism. They are talented researchers—many with young families—who trade two years of low pay and extremely long hours for the chance to be part of the group that are on the frontlines, in the yellow suits and masks, that has helped eradicate smallpox, push back polio, and solve the first major outbreaks of Legionnaires’ disease, toxic shock syndrome, and E. coli O157 and works to battle every new disease before it becomes an epidemic. Urgent, exhilarating, and compelling, Beating Back the Devil takes you inside the world of these medical detectives who are trying to stop the next epidemic—before the epidemics stop us.

    Jonathan Eisen

    This book is in his list of favorites.

    Mar 9, 2020 — Source

  • Microbe Hunters

    Microbe Hunters

    Microbe Hunters

    Paul de Kruif
    Medical
    4.14 (3,302)

    Presents twelve stories of the men who pioneered the study of bacteriology.

    Jonathan Eisen

    This book is in his list of favorites.

    Mar 9, 2020 — Source

  • A Planet of Viruses

    A Planet of Viruses

    A Planet of Viruses

    Carl Zimmer
    Medical
    4.05 (3,503)

    Viruses are the smallest living things known to science, yet they hold the entire planet in their sway. They helped give rise to the first life-forms, are responsible for many of our most devastating diseases, and will continue to control our fate for centuries. Carl Zimmer, the popular science writer and New York Times columnist, takes us from the first record of the common cold to the latest frontiers of biology, where scientists are expanding our understanding of life as we know it. This revised edition includes stories of new outbreaks, such as Ebola, MERS, and chikungunya virus; new scientific discoveries, such as a hundred-million-year-old virus that infected the common ancestor of armadillos, elephants, and humans; and new findings that show why climate change may lead to even deadlier outbreaks. Zimmer's lucid explanations and intriguing stories demonstrate how deeply humans and viruses are intertwined. As reassuring as it is frightening, Planet of Viruses is a fascinating tour of a formidable hidden world. -- from back cover.

    Jonathan Eisen

    This book is in his list of favorites.

    Mar 9, 2020 — Source

  • The Coming Plague

    The Coming Plague

    The Coming Plague

    Laurie Garrett
    Social Science
    4.20 (10,104)

    A New York Times bestseller The definitive account of the infectious diseases threatening humanity by Pulitzer Prize–winning investigative journalist Laurie Garrett "Prodigiously researched . . . A frightening vision of the future and a deeply unsettling one." —Michiko Kakutani, The New York Times After decades spent assuming that the conquest of infectious disease was imminent, people on all continents now find themselves besieged by AIDS, drug-resistant tuberculosis, cholera that defies chlorine water treatment, and exotic viruses that can kill in a matter of hours. Relying on extensive interviews with leading experts in virology, molecular biology, disease ecology, and medicine, as well as field research in sub-Saharan Africa, Western Europe, Central America, and the United States, Laurie Garrett's The Coming Plague takes readers from the savannas of eastern Bolivia to the rain forests of the northern Democratic Republic of the Congo on a harrowing, fifty year journey through the history of our battles with microbes. This book is a work of investigative reportage like no other and a wake-up call to a world that has become complacent in the face of infectious disease—one that offers a sobering and prescient warning about the dangers of ignoring the coming plague.

    Jonathan Eisen

    This book is in his list of favorites.

    Mar 9, 2020 — Source

  • Biohazard
    Jonathan Eisen

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    Mar 9, 2020 — Source

  • Spillover
    Jonathan Eisen

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    Mar 9, 2020 — Source

  • The Eleventh Plague

    The Eleventh Plague

    The Eleventh Plague

    Leonard A. Cole
    History
    4.00 (11)

    The Eleventh Plague deals with a terrifying and compelling subject: biological and chemical warfare. Using historical and contemporary examples, Cole explains what biological and chemical weapons are, how they are developed and tested, and what their effects can be. He vividly describes the very real threat that Iraq would use chemical weapons in the Gulf War - real enough that every man, woman, and child in Israel had to wear a gas mask. He also analyzes the possibility that the so-called Gulf War syndrome may have been due to biological or chemical weapons, a possibility that federal investigations have yet to confirm or disprove. Cole lucidly describes the wide range of possible responses to the threat of biological or chemical warfare. But every expert admits that absolute protection may be impossible. Materials can be easy to get, even easier to transport, and virtually impossible to trace. The Eleventh Plague arms us with a frightening knowledge. What do recent political and technical developments suggest for the future? And how will we fight this increasingly ominous, deadly plague?

    Jonathan Eisen

    This book is in his list of favorites.

    Mar 9, 2020 — Source

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