Recommendations

  • Where'd You Go, Bernadette

    Where'd You Go, Bernadette

    Where'd You Go, Bernadette

    Maria Semple
    Fiction
    3.89 (512,552)

    Bernadette Fox is notorious. To her Microsoft-guru husband, she's a fearlessly opinionated partner; to fellow private-school mothers in Seattle, she's a disgrace; to design mavens, she's a revolutionary architect, and to 15-year-old Bee, she is a best friend and, simply, Mom. Then Bernadette disappears. It began when Bee aced her report card and claimed her promised reward: a family trip to Antarctica. But Bernadette's intensifying allergy to Seattle--and people in general--has made her so agoraphobic that a virtual assistant in India now runs her most basic errands. A trip to the end of the earth is problematic. To find her mother, Bee compiles email messages, official documents, secret correspondence--creating a compulsively readable and touching novel about misplaced genius and a mother and daughter's role in an absurd world.

    Jane McGonigal

    I just wanted to say that I just finished Where'd You Go Bernadette and I loved it so much. This is the most fun I've had reading a book in ages. It was exactly what I need.

     — Source

  • Finite and Infinite Games

    Finite and Infinite Games

    Finite and Infinite Games

    James Carse
    Philosophy
    3.86 (4,483)

    “There are at least two kinds of games,” states James Carse as he begins this extraordinary book. “One could be called finite; the other infinite.” Finite games are the familiar contests of everyday life; they are played in order to be won, which is when they end. But infinite games are more mysterious. Their object is not winning, but ensuring the continuation of play. The rules may change, the boundaries may change, even the participants may change—as long as the game is never allowed to come to an end. What are infinite games? How do they affect the ways we play our finite games? What are we doing when we play—finitely or infinitely? And how can infinite games affect the ways in which we live our lives? Carse explores these questions with stunning elegance, teasing out of his distinctions a universe of observation and insight, noting where and why and how we play, finitely and infinitely. He surveys our world—from the finite games of the playing field and playing board to the infinite games found in culture and religion—leaving all we think we know illuminated and transformed. Along the way, Carse finds new ways of understanding everything from how an actress portrays a role, to how we engage in sex, from the nature of evil, to the nature of science. Finite games, he shows, may offer wealth and status, power and glory. But infinite games offer something far more subtle and far grander. Carse has written a book rich in insight and aphorism. Already an international literary event, Finite and Infinite Games is certain to be argued about and celebrated for years to come. Reading it is the first step in learning to play the infinite game.

    Jane McGonigal

    It's this big shock. It's like Sixth Sense.

     — Source

  • The Grasshopper
    Jane McGonigal

    Recommended on her Twitter account

     — Source

  • The Willpower Instinct
    Jane McGonigal

    the better book on will power is the Willpower Instinct

     — Source

  • Suffering Is Optional

    Suffering Is Optional

    Suffering Is Optional

    Cheri Huber
    Body
    Mind & Spirit
    4.02 (161)

    The 11th book from the American Zen teacher centers around three basic aspects of Zen practice: pay attention, believe nothing, and don't take anything personally. Huber gently guides the reader along this path in this book produced with a handwritten font and pen and ink drawings.

    Jane McGonigal

    That's another good book.

     — Source