Bryan Johnson's favorite books

  • Why We Sleep

    Why We Sleep

    Why We Sleep

    Matthew Walker
    Health & Fitness
    4.36 (110,096)

    "Sleep is one of the most important but least understood aspects of our life, wellness, and longevity ... An explosion of scientific discoveries in the last twenty years has shed new light on this fundamental aspect of our lives. Now ... neuroscientist and sleep expert Matthew Walker gives us a new understanding of the vital importance of sleep and dreaming"--Amazon.com.

    Bryan Johnson

    high-quality sleep is the best protector and enhancer of health and cognition

     — Source

  • Number

    Number

    Number

    Tobias Dantzig
    Mathematics
    4.09 (556)

    A new edition of the classic introduction to mathematics, first published in 1930 and revised in the 1950s, explains the history and tenets of mathematics, including the relationship of mathematics to the other sciences and profiles of the luminaries whose research expanded the human concept of number. Reprint. 25,000 first printing.

    Bryan Johnson

    One of 9 books...which created a cascade of original ideas, freshness of mind and clarity of thought

     — Source

  • A Mind at Play
    Bryan Johnson

    One of 9 books...which created a cascade of original ideas, freshness of mind and clarity of thought

     — Source

  • When Einstein Walked with Gödel

    When Einstein Walked with Gödel

    When Einstein Walked with Gödel

    Jim Holt
    Science
    4.03 (1,516)

    From Jim Holt, the New York Times bestselling author of Why Does the World Exist?, comes an entertaining and accessible guide to the most profound scientific and mathematical ideas of recent centuries in When Einstein Walked with Gödel: Excursions to the Edge of Thought. Does time exist? What is infinity? Why do mirrors reverse left and right but not up and down? In this scintillating collection, Holt explores the human mind, the cosmos, and the thinkers who’ve tried to encompass the latter with the former. With his trademark clarity and humor, Holt probes the mysteries of quantum mechanics, the quest for the foundations of mathematics, and the nature of logic and truth. Along the way, he offers intimate biographical sketches of celebrated and neglected thinkers, from the physicist Emmy Noether to the computing pioneer Alan Turing and the discoverer of fractals, Benoit Mandelbrot. Holt offers a painless and playful introduction to many of our most beautiful but least understood ideas, from Einsteinian relativity to string theory, and also invites us to consider why the greatest logician of the twentieth century believed the U.S. Constitution contained a terrible contradiction—and whether the universe truly has a future.

    Bryan Johnson

    One of 9 books...which created a cascade of original ideas, freshness of mind and clarity of thought

     — Source

  • Siddhartha

    Siddhartha

    Siddhartha

    Hermann Hesse
    Fiction
    4.04 (630,019)

    This allegorical novel, set in sixth-century India around the time of the Buddha, follows a young man on his search for enlightenment. THIS ENRICHED CLASSIC EDITION INCLUDES: A concise introduction that gives the reader important background information A chronology of the author's life and work A timeline of significant events that provides the book's historical context An outline of key themes and plot points to guide the reader's own interpretations Detailed explanatory notes Critical analysis, including contemporary and modern perspectives on the work Discussion questions to promote lively classroom and book group interaction A list of recommended related books and films to broaden the reader's experience

    Bryan Johnson

    I have gifted...Siddhartha

     — Source

  • The End Of Science

    The End Of Science

    The End Of Science

    John Horgan
    Science
    3.57 (535)

    In The End of Science, John Horgan makes the case that the era of truly profound scientific revelations about the universe and our place in it is over. Interviewing scientific luminaries such as Stephen Hawking, Francis Crick, and Richard Dawkins, he demonstrates that all the big questions that can be answered have been answered, as science bumps up against fundamental limits. The world cannot give us a “theory of everything,” and modern endeavors such as string theory are “ironic” and “theological” in nature, not scientific, because they are impossible to confirm. Horgan's argument was controversial in 1996, and it remains so today, still firing up debates in labs and on the internet, not least because—as Horgan details in a lengthy new introduction—ironic science is more prevalent than ever. Still, while Horgan offers his critique, grounded in the thinking of the world's leading researchers, he offers homage, too. If science is ending, he maintains, it is only because it has done its work so well.

    Bryan Johnson

    One of 9 books...which created a cascade of original ideas, freshness of mind and clarity of thought

     — Source

  • Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance

    Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance

    Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance

    Robert M. Pirsig
    Essence (Philosophy)
    3.77 (214,224)

    A book which speaks directly to the confusions and agonies of existence, detailing a personal, philosophical odyssey.

    Bryan Johnson

    One of 9 books...which created a cascade of original ideas, freshness of mind and clarity of thought

     — Source

  • Behave

    Behave

    Behave

    Robert M. Sapolsky
    Science
    4.42 (13,826)

    Why do we do the things we do? attempts to answer that question, looking at it from every angle. He hops back in time, in stages, ultimately ending up at the deep history of our species and its evolutionary legacy. The result is a dazzling tour of the science of human, a majestic synthesis that harvests cutting-edge research across a range of disciplines to provide a subtle and nuanced perspective on why we ultimately do the things we do-- for good and for ill.

    Bryan Johnson

    One of 9 books...which created a cascade of original ideas, freshness of mind and clarity of thought

     — Source

  • The Annotated Flatland

    The Annotated Flatland

    The Annotated Flatland

    Ian Stewart
    Science

    Flatland is a unique, delightful satire that has charmed readers for over a century. Published in 1884 by the English clergyman and headmaster Edwin A. Abbott, it is the fanciful tale of A. Square, a two-dimensional being who is whisked away by a mysterious visitor to The Land of Three Dimensions, an experience that forever alters his worldview. Like the original, Ian Stewart's commentary takes readers on a strange and wonderful journey. With clarity and wit, Stewart illuminates Abbott's numerous Victorian references and touches on such diverse topics as ancient Babylon, Karl Marx, Mary Shelley's Frankenstein, Mt. Everest, H.G. Wells, and phrenology. The Annotated Flatland makes fascinating connections between Flatland and Abbott's era, resulting in a classic to rival Abbott's own, and a book that will inspire and delight curious readers for generations to come.

    Bryan Johnson

    One of 9 books...which created a cascade of original ideas, freshness of mind and clarity of thought

     — Source

  • But What If We're Wrong?

    But What If We're Wrong?

    But What If We're Wrong?

    Chuck Klosterman
    Philosophy
    3.63 (15,132)

    "But What If We're Wrong? visualizes the contemporary world as it will appear to those who'll perceive it as the distant past"--

    Bryan Johnson

    One of 9 books...which created a cascade of original ideas, freshness of mind and clarity of thought

     — Source

  • Zero

    Zero

    Zero

    Charles Seife
    Biography & Autobiography
    3.97 (9,181)

    The history of a controversial but important number begins with its inventors, the Babylonians, and follows its tumultuous and fascinating story to the present era of supercomputers and quantum physics. Reprint.

    Bryan Johnson

    I\'ve become a zero detective.

     — Source

  • Principles

    Principles

    Principles

    Ray Dalio
    Business & Economics

    #1 New York Times Bestseller “Significant...The book is both instructive and surprisingly moving.” —The New York Times Ray Dalio, one of the world’s most successful investors and entrepreneurs, shares the unconventional principles that he’s developed, refined, and used over the past forty years to create unique results in both life and business—and which any person or organization can adopt to help achieve their goals. In 1975, Ray Dalio founded an investment firm, Bridgewater Associates, out of his two-bedroom apartment in New York City. Forty years later, Bridgewater has made more money for its clients than any other hedge fund in history and grown into the fifth most important private company in the United States, according to Fortune magazine. Dalio himself has been named to Time magazine’s list of the 100 most influential people in the world. Along the way, Dalio discovered a set of unique principles that have led to Bridgewater’s exceptionally effective culture, which he describes as “an idea meritocracy that strives to achieve meaningful work and meaningful relationships through radical transparency.” It is these principles, and not anything special about Dalio—who grew up an ordinary kid in a middle-class Long Island neighborhood—that he believes are the reason behind his success. In Principles, Dalio shares what he’s learned over the course of his remarkable career. He argues that life, management, economics, and investing can all be systemized into rules and understood like machines. The book’s hundreds of practical lessons, which are built around his cornerstones of “radical truth” and “radical transparency,” include Dalio laying out the most effective ways for individuals and organizations to make decisions, approach challenges, and build strong teams. He also describes the innovative tools the firm uses to bring an idea meritocracy to life, such as creating “baseball cards” for all employees that distill their strengths and weaknesses, and employing computerized decision-making systems to make believability-weighted decisions. While the book brims with novel ideas for organizations and institutions, Principles also offers a clear, straightforward approach to decision-making that Dalio believes anyone can apply, no matter what they’re seeking to achieve. Here, from a man who has been called both “the Steve Jobs of investing” and “the philosopher king of the financial universe” (CIO magazine), is a rare opportunity to gain proven advice unlike anything you’ll find in the conventional business press.

    Bryan Johnson

    Recommended on medium.com

     — Source